Search results for "high pressure laminate"

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Colorful “little mountains” highlight Eastern Europe’s first children’s museum and science center

The 35,000 sq. ft. building celebrates three artisanal crafts significant in Bulgaria: textiles, wood carving, and glazed ceramics.

Lee H. Skolnick Architecture and Design Partnership has designed a new children’s museum called "Muzeiko" in Bulgaria’s capital city of Sofia to balance complex form, regional relevance, and whimsical fun. Their client, the America for Bulgaria Foundation, wanted international expertise paired with state of the art materials. The architects responded to the geography of the Sofia Valley, a region surrounded by mountain ranges, with abstracted forms referring to the nearby Balkan mountains, triangulated in a "scientific" manner. This thematic element, coined “Little Mountains” by the architect, is composed of a rainscreen assembly consisting of high pressure laminate (HPL) panels with printed graphics clipped onto a wall system framed by a combination of a primary steel framework, and a fiber reinforced concrete shell. The panels are differentiated with color and patterns unique to traditional artisanal Bulgarian crafts. Textiles and embroidery, wood carving, and glazed ceramics were studied by the architects, and reduced into three color-saturated patterns which were ultimately applied to three forms. Another feature of the building is a “super insulated” curtain wall assembly of triple glazed low-e glass, custom built locally by TAL Engineering. The glass panels were some of the largest available in the region at the time, sized at 7’-4” x 10’-10.” A custom ceramic frit pattern, developed by the architects, creates a “cloud-like” effect while establishing view control and addressing solar gain concerns on the south facade. The curtain wall extends beyond the roof to form a parapet guard at the roof deck, where the frit pattern dissolves enough to catch a glimpse of the sky beyond the facade from ground level. Also notable is a custom gray coloration on the mullions, which is the result of numerous mockups studying the least visually distracting color to the overall system.
  • Facade Manufacturer TAL Engineering (building envelope)
  • Architects Lee H. Skolnick Architecture + Design Partnership; A&A Architects (Associate Architect)
  • Facade Installer Bigla III Ltd. (contractor, constr. manager)
  • Facade Consultants TAL Engineering (building envelope)
  • Location Sofia, Bulgaria
  • Date of Completion 2015
  • System rainscreen on steel frame, high performance curtainwall, green roof
  • Products high pressure laminate (HPL) panels with printed media, triple insulated low-e glazing panels with applied ceramic frit
Beyond the curtain wall assembly, notable sustainable features include solar panel array on the south wing, recycled grey water for irrigation, and interpretive sustainable features on display throughout the interior of the building. A key precedent for the project is the University of Mexico City, says Lee Skolnick, FAIA, Principal of LHSA+DP, which has an “incredible facade of mosaic tile.” Skolnick says the project was an attempt at the time to marry modern architecture with cultural significance. "It’s a concept that has been used rarely throughout recent architecture history. 'Interpretive content' on the face of the building is coming back, but it is not universal. We much more often see patterning that is geometric or structural — a geometric blanket that wraps a form. We are looking for something that is more highly specific than that.” At key moments along the building envelope, the colorful “little mountain” forms visually penetrate beyond the curtain wall system into the interior, establishing specialized programmatic spaces such as a gift shop, cafe, eating area, restrooms, and multipurpose workshops. One challenge the design team faced was developing a patterning for the rainscreen panels. They began by considering a variety of materials and fabrication methods available, from ceramic materials, to fabrics, to etched metal panels. Ultimately the architects chose a high pressure laminate (HPL) material for maintenance, manufacturing quality and consistency, detailing control, and lifespan of material. Through a process of "continual sampling, processing, and refining," the architects arrived at a set of patterns which boldy abstract the colors, patterns, and textures of Bulgarian artistry.

Timber Towers

Structural engineers are exploring an unexpected material for high-rise construction, one that may have significant environmental benefits: wood
Concrete and steel enabled the advent of the skyscraper, and in just about a century they helped that form reach mountainous heights. But these materials have an environmental impact that can’t be ignored. That fact is driving a new generation of designers to reconsider wood. Concrete and steel production is responsible for about 8 percent of the world’s emissions of carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas mainly to blame for climate change. The majority of both materials go to fuel the construction boom in China, which nearly doubled its use of steel in the last ten years. Asia’s ongoing building boom is mostly in response to the extreme demand for housing created by its growing and rapidly urbanizing population. More than a billion people will move or be born into Asian cities in the next 20 years. Billions more are already homeless or living in slums. While the density of high-rise living cuts down on transportation and energy emissions, that’s at odds with the carbon content of its two favorite materials. Looking at a California redwood, which can stand nearly 40 stories tall, it’s not hard to imagine a wood structure reaching such heights. And its carbon profile isn’t just less than competing materials; it is potentially carbon negative. As the poet Bill Yakes wrote, “Trees are our lungs turned inside out.” That is, they grow by drinking up carbon dioxide, exhaling oxygen in return. Every cubic meter of wood stores more than three quarters of a ton of carbon. Canadian firm Michael Green Architecture just broke ground on what will be the tallest wood building in North America. Designers in Europe and Australia have also gone above wood’s traditional three- or four-story limits. But in the U.S.—where code constraints, economics, and a social stigma prevent construction—the idea has been slower to catch on. Since they helped set off a flurry of interest in the topic of tall wood construction about ten years ago, a pioneering few designers and engineers have seized on the potential of manufacturing breakthroughs to give one of the world’s oldest construction materials new life. They say urbanization, population, and climate change are on course for a head-on collision that architects have a responsibility to help avert, and wood construction is how.   Seeds to buildings When British architects Waugh Thistleton set out to the build the Stadthaus building, now called the Graphite Apartments, in the east London borough of Hackney, they weren’t stacking two-by-fours. Apart from a reinforced concrete plinth and fiber-cement facade panels, the entire building is made from cross-laminated timber (CLT). Essentially huge wood sections that behave like shear walls, CLT panels were the first in a series of material advances that opened up design possibilities for tall timber. Manufacturers like KLH Massivholz GmbH in Austria, where 80 percent of CLT is still made, pile up sheets of wood at 90-degree angels and paste or glue them together into something resembling a jumbo piece of plywood. “Our biggest job talking to code officials and the fire department was making sure they distinguished between stick-frame and CLT,” said principal Andrew Waugh. “You’re dealing with a more solid robust material. With a stick-frame system you’re relying on the guy on site.” CLT is assembled off-site, which cuts down on construction errors and time. The Graphite Apartments, a nine-story mixed-use building, was built in just under one year—months less than expected. A layer of drywall over the thick CLT panels helped the structure earn a fire resistance rating between 60 and 90 minutes, passing code. Heavy timber and cross-laminated timber actually have built-in fire protection; dense wood will burn slowly, charring instead of catching fire all at once. Part of bringing a wood building up to code is providing enough wood so that even after fire produces a “char layer,” there is still enough left to support the structure. On Green’s forthcoming Wood Innovation Design Center in Vancouver, a pre-charred cedar exterior dramatically improved its fire rating. Acoustics, another traditional failing of wood construction, is also heartier in CLT towers. An air gap, compressed insulation, and a floor slab totaling about 14 inches overall helped the Graphite Apartments meet stringent UK acoustics requirements. CLT is not produced in the U.S., nor are newer iterations of high-rise-ready timber panels, like laminated strand lumber (LSL) or laminated veneer lumber (LVL). But as more high-rises are built with wood, Waugh hopes his firm will find a U.S. client. “The more you build with timber, the more you realize how steeped in concrete we really are,” he said. “It’s still a relatively conservative industry, the construction industry, but when contractors build one they want to build more.” Waugh built his own CLT home with three friends. He said the wood imparts an emotional value. “It’s a beautiful place to live. You know you’re living in a space captured by a natural material.”   Timber towers Michael Green, Waugh Thistleton, and several European firms—Berg | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson have proposed a 34-story "ultra-modern residential high-rise building" for Stockholm—are the face of the timber tower movement, but they recently added a company from the old guard of skyscraper design to their ranks: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. When SOM engineers first floated the idea of a 20-story wood tower, one partner’s response wasn’t the skepticism one might expect from a master of steel-and-concrete structural systems. “Do 30,” he reportedly told them. “It’s a high standard. We wanted to set a high benchmark,” SOM’s Bill Baker told AN. They chose the 1965 DeWitt-Chestnut Apartment Building in Chicago as their standard, the first building in the world to use the “framed tube” structural system devised by SOM engineer Fazlur Khan. “We wanted to show not just that it was possible,” said SOM’s Benton Johnson, “but make it competitive with concrete.” The prototype isn’t pure wood. A concrete core and joints mean the system uses about one quarter as much concrete as the actual Dewitt-Chestnut. Structural steel anchors the building at its base, using about 15 percent as much steel as a typical composite system. SOM’s report examined five schemes with varying amounts of timber, steel, and concrete, trying to replicate the landmark building’s structure. They focused on reducing the weight of the floors, where most of the material weight is contained. Wood high-rises already built in Europe, such as the Graphite Apartments in London, use a lot of load-bearing walls to hold up the structure. But that would limit the building owner’s options for renters, Johnson said, as would the immovable columns placed throughout. To make the Dewitt-Chestnut system work without drastically shrinking the floorplate or beefing up the structural system, SOM zeroed in on what engineers call the boundary condition—its mathematical pressure point. To illustrate, Johnson built two stacks of tile samples and placed a ruler on top to span the distance between. He balanced a can of La Croix water on the ruler, the building’s floor in this example. The ruler bowed beneath its weight, but its edges also flared up, making a slight u-shape. But with a few more tiles placed on each stack to pin down the ruler, it held its shape. In his example, the ruler is a solid timber floor, while the tile stacks are reinforced concrete wall joints and beams. Without concrete, SOM’s engineers determined the Dewitt-Chestnut would need custom 13.5-inch CLT panels to support the floorplate’s core-to-window span. That would be too expensive and would use more material in just the floors than the whole of the original building. “It just started solving all these problems for us,” Johnson said. “You have the concrete to hold it all together—basically all this timber coming together and concrete sealing it at the joints.” It would take about 12 million cubic yards of timber to build, the report estimated—less than one-hundredth of one percent of the annual North American timber harvest.   Scaling back Even if engineers can solve these problems, there is still a stigma involved with tall wood structures. Antony Wood, executive director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, counted timber towers among the “quiet revolutions” happening in tall building design. “I think the fear of timber is that it’s an organic material,” he said. “It’s not manufactured to provide a structural member like steel or concrete is.” Wood rots, so it must be kept out of the rain. SOM’s system swaps wood for a steel frame at the building’s base to prevent water damage during flooding. Most critics worry about fire. Tall timber skeptics seized on a structural fire at the job site of a six-story wood building in Richmond, British Columbia, in 2011. In the city just south of Vancouver, what would have been the first wood-frame six-story building in Canada burned to the ground on May 3. Steel companies were quick to blame the wood frame’s flammability. But Canadian Wood Council President Michael Giroux pushed back, noting the construction team hadn’t yet installed safety features, including fire sprinklers. “To suggest that the outcome of the May 3 fire at the Remy project in Richmond would have been the same if the building had been fully completed, is not plausible,” he wrote. Even tall timber’s champions concede the material isn’t suitable for super-tall buildings. But they say building codes, which in many places restrict wood to only low-rise construction, isn’t up to date with structural engineering advancements. “It’s time to reconvene and reconsider what we’re doing,” Waugh said. “We need to densify our cities to leave ground for agriculture and wildlife. Condensed cities are much more efficient places. But I don’t think these Babel-sized towers are the way.” And some go as far as to say the threat of climate change means wood high-rises are our only choice.   Wood world In 2009, the government of British Columbia endorsed a “culture of wood” requiring designers of public buildings to prove they can not use wood before considering other materials. With millions of acres of forests in the U.S. and Canada devastated by mountain pine beetles, it was a prudent move for a province home to one of the world’s busiest forestry sectors. But if wood construction is going to take off on the scale envisioned by its pioneering architects, Michael Green said, the “wood first” policy will have to become “carbon first.” “We need to create incentives around climate change instead of seeing it all as a hindrance,” he told AN. “Let all industries benefit—it allows the concrete and steel industries to make their case. By no means is one exclusive of the other. Let’s use all materials where it’s most appropriate.” While at MGB (mcfarlane green biggar ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN), Green released an open source platform for wood tower construction—a structural system to engineer tall buildings 12, 20, or 30 stories high. Several iterations later, his wood-based structural systems have started a conversation in Vancouver, where he is based. Green said the warmth of wood interiors and buildings’ retreat from airplane-scale heights could help solve another problem of modern high-rise construction: social sustainability. Whereas many residential skyscrapers are isolating, new typologies developed with wood in mind—not traditional forms grafted onto wood frames—could change the mindset. As with British Columbia’s “wood first” policy, the UK’s performance-based code has created an opportunity for timber construction, while U.S. code remains constrictive. But it wasn’t novelty that ultimately built Waugh Thistleton’s Graphite Apartments. At a cost of about $2,200 per square foot, the building was 15 percent cheaper than if it had been made from concrete. By 2050, concrete use is predicted to reach four times its 1990 level. And production of steel and concrete are on track to balloon, eclipsing advances in recycling and materials science that could shrink their carbon footprints. “We need to really hit reboot on how we build environments,” Green said. “As architects we owe it to ourselves to push these boundaries.”
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Product> Surface Effective: Eight Innovative Cladding Materials & Systems
From enhancing aesthetics with digitally-printed ceramic panels to increasing build-speed via all-in-one insulated metal panel systems, these innovative building products offer specialized facade solutions to architects. ClearShade Insulated Glass Panel Panelite A glazing solution that optimizes both daylight and solar heat control, its honeycomb insert is offered in a range of colors and patterns; customization is available. Dekton Cosentino Available in sheets up to 126 by 56 inches and thicknesses of 8, 12, and 20 millimeters, this ultra-compacted material has a high compressive strength, is non-porous, and UV resistant. In ten colors and textures. Dot-to-Dot Tagina The system is based on three-dimensional ceramic modules that function as pixels when mounted to an exterior facade. Consulting with the manufacturer, designers can create their own limited edition glazed porcelain tiles for ventilated facades or other architectural coverings. Benchmark Kingspan A single package system that combines the energy efficiency of IMPs with a proprietary carrier panel system that accommodates many cladding options, including aluminum composite material, metal composite material, ceramic granite, thin brick, plate, high pressure laminate, and ceramic tile. Renewall Lamboo Laminated bamboo elements are up to 20 percent more stable than hardwoods, while milling, sanding, and finishing using conventional machinery. Its naturally occurring silica content resists insects and fungal agents. LEED eligible. Hashtag Cambridge Architectural In panels up to 96 inches wide, the flattened surface area of this rigid stainless steel mesh boosts reflectivity. Produced from 100 percent recycled materials, it is LEED eligible. Lea Lab Lea Ceramiche Architects can create their own custom cladding imagery on ultra-thin, oversized ceramic panels using the Lea Lab digital printing technology. Upload high-resolution files, specify the panel size, and the manufacturing process is initiated. Baltic GKD Metal Fabrics With a range of visible light transmittance from .28 to .42 and a solar gain coefficient of between .20 and .29, this metal fabric makes an effective sunshade.
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Product> Finds from the Floor at AIA 2013 Expo
Between keynote sessions, awards presentations, and interviews at the American Institute of Architects' (AIA) National 2013 Convention, AN's editors joined 20,000 attending architects in the search for the newest and most innovative products on the floor of the Colorado Convention Center's exposition hall. Following are a few notable discoveries. SureClad Porcelain Stone Crossville The Tennessee-based supplier of interior ceramics has partnered with Shackerley, a British manufacturer of porcelain ventilated facade systems, for an exterior cladding solution that meets U.S. building codes, including all seismic and hurricane standards. The system (pictured above) is supported by an aluminum frame and is delivered to job sites as a prefabricated system to ensure fast and efficient installation. SunGuard Neutral 78/65 Guardian Industries Developed to passively retain heat in colder climates, Neutral 78/65's low-E coating facilitates high visible light and a neutral color. It can be used in double- or triple-glazed units and can also be combined with any of SunGuard's other low-E coatings. AA5450 Series OptiQ Window Kawneer The new series in the OptiQ line of windows maintains thermal continuity and reduces energy transmission in both single and double hung constructions thanks to a polyamide thermal break. The 4-and-5/8-inch aluminum frame maintains a minimal profile and can be outfitted with 1-inch double pane or 1-and-1/2-inch triple pane insulated glass. OptiQ Windows are also available with expanded configurations. Benchmark Facade Systems Kingspan A fully integrated line of ventilated exterior cladding debuted at AIA 2013 and is now available from Kingspan. The company supplies a complete system of metal rails, insulated panels with a Bayer-developed polyurethane, and fastening solutions. The cladding is available in aluminum composite material (ACM), metal composite material (MCM), plate, high pressure laminate (HPL), ceramic granite, terra cotta, and thin brick, and comes in a broad range of colors. YUW 750 XTH Unitized Wall System YKK Hurricane and impact mitigating glazing for low- to mid-rise commercial buildings can be applied to multi-span curtain and single-span ribbon walls with YKK's latest addition to its ProTek portfolio. The new wall system can be specified with visible exterior face covers, a four-sided structural silicone glaze, or in a combination of both. It also boasts U-factors as low as .30.
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Concrete Jungle

New timber research finds exciting potential in steel and concrete composites
With mass timber projects on the rise around the United State, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) and Oregon State University (OSU) have partnered to produce two new reports on how timber buildings can overcome their technical limitations by integrating steel and concrete. The new composite systems being proposed would allow timber construction to rise higher than before, with longer floor spans. The OSU Testing Report, released earlier this month, looked into the possibility of combining cross-laminated timber (CLT) floor systems with a concrete topper, to improve the strength of the flooring as well as lengthen its span. To accurately represent real-world conditions, the SOM team first drew up plans for a “typical” 11-story residential building and indicated where the wood columns would normally be. With the floor span determined, the CLT flooring was stress tested for load, bending, cracking and shearing, before and after the application of a concrete slab. A 2.25-inch thick concrete layer was applied over a 6.75-inch thick CLT floor for the experiment. After testing smaller, individual sections, an eight-foot-by-36-foot full-sized mockup was created and subjected to load testing, only failing after engineers applied eight times the normal service load, or around 82,000 pounds of pressure. One complicating factor is that CLT can be charred for a higher fire rating at the expense of its strength, and any real-world application of CLT would need to be thicker than in testing conditions. Still, the results are a promising first step to increasing floor spans in timber buildings as well as improving their acoustic properties. The second report was produced in conjunction with the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) and examined how steel framing can best be integrated with timber floor systems. Because steel framing can span much greater distances than timber with smaller columns, and because CLT is lighter than concrete, a building that uses both should get the best of both worlds. In SOM’s modeling, this combination model was equally as strong as a steel and concrete building while offering window bays of the same size as a typical residential building. Ideally, high-rise timber construction of the future would combine both of these techniques, as the concrete slab topper adds extra seismic protection. With timber construction offering the potential for more sustainable, durable and quickly assembled towers, hybrid research could be a stepping stone towards bringing mass timber construction into the mainstream. All of SOM’s timber research reports can be found here.
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Turntable Lab

SITU Studio crafts a uniquely flexible display system for a New York City vinyl record and audiophile store

Despite the recent resurgence in vinyl record sales, brick-and-mortar music retail remains a challenging business. New York City’s Turntable Lab—which sells vinyl, high-end audiophile equipment, and merchandise, catering to professional DJs and casual listeners alike—had successfully graduated from its small starting location near the Cooper Union to a larger, 1,200-square-foot space nearby. But Turntable’s owners knew their store needed to be nimble to survive. “Products always change…how you display things, where you might need to move things around. Maximum flexibility was what we were shooting for,” said Turntable Lab partner David Azzoni. The new store required that adaptability, but the owners didn’t want to lose the gritty basement feel of the old location.

They turned to Brooklyn-based interdisciplinary firm SITU Studio; the two teams had already collaborated to design a no-frills, flat-pack turntable stand that was successfully Kickstarted. Aleksey Lukyanov-Cherny, partner at SITU Studio, said the firm looked to DIY sources for inspiration for the store. “The brilliant detail: It’s a cleat. It’s actually something very straightforward, something your DIY handyman at home will build in his garage for tools,” he explained. The cleats run throughout the space, supporting around 10 different sets of brackets, hooks, and rails, all of which hold stands, shelves, and display inserts.

This system allows for extreme flexibility, but SITU Studio had to work hard to refine the cleat, ensuring that the racks would be secure without requiring tools or extensive force to change them around. Turntable Lab also visited SITU Studio’s workshop throughout the design process, bringing samples of products, to measure what dimensions and displays worked best. “We spent a lot of time just drawing and cutting these things out, playing with just the round-overs, the radiuses…there was a lot of massaging radiuses,” Lukyanov-Cherny recalled. One major decision was to cut out the center of the display brackets, thereby keeping the cases visually open. “It just flows,” said Azzoni.

SITU Studio selected clear finished and untreated Baltic birch plywood for the entire system, with high-pressure laminate for its heavily used surfaces. The plywood—CNC-milled into shape—retains the old shop’s raw, utilitarian feel but balances it with clean lines. And Turntable Lab’s owners couldn’t be happier with the result. Armed with a basic set of display units, they can easily swap out products and how they’re displayed. In the back of the store, each vinyl storage/display unit rolls on wheels and can be moved to make space for events.

Parked among the vinyl records and T-shirts is the old store’s timeworn turntable stand, still used by DJs for in-store concerts. Its plywood has weathered darkly with use, and it sharply contrasts with the fresh plywood around it. But it won’t be the only aged one for long.

“These things can take a beating; you don’t want to refine things that people will be touching. You want to think about materiality and how it ages over time,” Lukyanov-Cherny said. “Eventually,” he added, gesturing from the new plywood displays to the old turntable stand, “they’re all gonna look like this!”

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Not Your Grandad's Passive Design

Passive-Aggressive design: When sustainability radically shapes architecture

This article is part of  The Architect’s Newspaper’s “Passive Aggressive” feature on passive design strategies. Not to be confused with “Passivhaus” or “Passive House” certification, passive design strategies such as solar chimneys, trombe walls, solar orientation, and overhangs, rely on scheme rather than technology to respond to their environmental contexts. Today, architects are more concerned with sustainability than ever, and new takes on old passive techniques are not only responsible, but can produce architecture that expresses sustainable features through formal exuberance. We call it “passive-aggressive.” In this feature, we examine three components—diagram, envelope, and material—where designers are marrying form and performance. We also look back at the unexpected history of passive-aggressive architecture, talk with passive-aggressive architects, and check out a passive-aggressive house. More “Passive Aggressive” articles are listed at the bottom of the page!

Diagram

The promise of architecturally considered, environmentally conscious buildings that are more than exercises in technological prosthetics is taking shape around the world. Sustainable design can be achieved without subjugating space, form, experience, and aesthetics, concepts that often end up subservient to green concerns. Even offices are moving beyond the often-gauche addition of solar panels and sun shades to typical building typologies. To do so, form is playing an important role in achieving sustainability goals, and a new crop of spatially and formally exuberant projects is being realized. The result is a series of buildings that neither perform—or look—like anything we have seen before.

Perhaps the best test of a project’s sustainability aspirations is an extreme climate. Drastic temperature changes, remote locales, and inhospitable landscapes call for more than technological gadgetry to produce even a habitable project. Deserts in particular present challenges that push conventional designs to their limits. When New York firm WORKac began designing a guesthouse in southern Arizona with the goal of being completely off the grid, it looked to the southwest Earthship typology to start. Earthships are passive solar homes that use a combination of natural and upcycled materials embedded in the earth to create a thermal mass that keeps their interiors cool during the day and warm at night. WORKac took some of these concepts and elevated them into a unique architectural form. A simple diagram, the heart of the project is an adobe brick mass, upon which airy living spaces are cantilevered above the ground.

New York–based MOS Architects engaged the desert climate in its Museum of Outdoor Arts Element House. A guesthouse and visitor center for the Star Axis land art project by the artist Charles Ross, the project hovers just above the New Mexico desert on stout concrete piers. The house, designed to be off the grid, is built out of prefabricated structural insulated panels. By distilling the project down to its basic architectural components, a theme among many MOS projects, a clear yet expressive geometric system governs its overall shape. Rather than a central hearth, a series of modules each has its own solar chimney. The result is a naturally lit interior without excessive glazing to increase solar gain. A reflective aluminum shingle cladding counters even more of the sun’s intense rays while also playing visual games with the overall form. Views out of the project are captured through deeply inset operable glass walls at the ends of each module. The only typical sustainable technology visible is a solar array folly, situated just a few yards from the building.

On the other side of the world in another desert climate, Zaha Hadid Architects supersized its sustainable efforts. The King Abdullah Petroleum Studies and Research Center (KAPSARC) was founded in 2010 by its namesake as an independent, nonprofit research institution to investigate the future of energy economics and technology. KAPSARC will bring together researchers and scientists from 20 nations into one planned community in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Currently under construction, KAPSARC will become the main building of the campus, while formally being a campus within itself. An aggregation of six-sided plant-cell-shaped spaces, the project is a series of conditioned and unconditioned laboratories, conference rooms, lecture halls, and courtyards. Thanks to the office’s mastery of parametricism, angles, openings, and surfaces are cleverly utilized to manipulate sunlight, blocking it or allowing it into the advantage of the occupants. The modules also permit future expansion while maintaining the overall form and performance. The complex interlocking forms, and green-water-filled courtyards passively cooling surrounding spaces, echo traditional Arab courtyards buildings.

While designers strive to capture and control sunlight in the desert, in more northern climates it can be a scarce resource that is protected by code. In a city like Toronto, which averages six months of regular snowfall, new buildings can be required to allow sunlight to hit the sidewalk for portions of the day. For large projects like Bjarke Ingels Group’s (BIG) King Street development, sunlight, views, and greenspace were calculated using the latest in super-computer simulation modeling. Though the pixelated project will resemble the early diagram-driven ones from Ingels’s days with PLOT, such as the Mountain Dwelling project, King Street will be undeniably more complex. Within BIG, a smaller studio called BIG Ideas works in collaboration with Microsoft to develop predictive modeling tools for direct use by the designers. “All of the hill heights are determined by the sun and site,” Jakob Lange, BIG partner, explained. “Big Ideas created a tool for the design team to use to generate the formation of the hills. On the sidewalk, you need at least a certain amount of sunlight. The only way you can do that is to have a machine that can test every point.” The result is a seemingly haphazard stack of blocks that allow copious light and air into each unit and terrace, as well to streets and public courtyards. 

Whether through high-tech computer modeling or low-tech desert vernacular, passive sustainable design is turning a corner. No longer an afterthought, environmental considerations have stopped holding projects visually captive. With improved agency, architects are striking a delicate balance between formal, spatial experience and sustainable considerations.

—Matthew Messner

Envelope

Be aggressive and show off your passive sustainability strategy facade first.

Bates Masi Architects’ Amagansett Dunes home, a modest cottage a few hundred feet from the ocean on the South Shore of Long Island, is covered on its east and west sides with operable glass. Different-sized adjustable openings create a pressure differential that promotes natural ventilation. To modulate light through these surfaces, the firm installed canvas louvers that admit cool breezes in the summer and block cold winds in the winter.

Each tapered louver is cut from one piece of canvas and wrapped around a powdered aluminum frame, its riveted strips slightly twisted to increase their transparency. The canvas pattern, which was developed through several digital and physical models, casts dappled light and dramatic shadows throughout the house and creates a lantern effect at night.

Another dramatic facade is located at Carrier Johnson + Culture’s Point Loma Nazarene University in San Diego. The concrete project has achieved LEED Gold certification through a number of sustainable solutions—from drought-resistant landscaping to smart solar orientation—and is lined with a curved, south-facing stainless-steel screen that reflects solar heat while allowing in natural light. A concrete roof overhang provides additional shading for the building and an adjacent outdoor walkway serves both as a pedestrian connector and a sort of double-layered facade. A new public plaza fronts the other side of the wall.

The wall’s staggered, water-jet-cut steel panels are unique: Each one contains a gap to allow air and views and is connected to a series of steel posts. The screen’s design makes subtle references to the religious campus, employing alpha and omega symbols, images from the cosmos, and other abstract references. “It’s both an art piece and an environmental wall,” Carrier Johnson + Culture’s design principal Ray Varela said.

Halfway around the world in Tehran, Iran, Admun Design and Construction created a memorable brick facade that shields the hot sun, encourages natural ventilation, and provides privacy while allowing limited, interesting patterns of light. Inspired by the surrounding neighborhood buildings and the city’s chaotic skyline, the facade is composed of variously rotated bricks with varied apertures. The openings change size based on the views, sun angles, and external distractions. Mortar was removed by punching the bricks, and the scheme was designed using parametric software. The process was carried out by the builders through a simple coding system. A ledge was placed in the gap between the brick membrane and the outer edge to provide space for flower boxes and to give cleaning access to the windows from outside. Balconies were placed behind the brick facade.

Indeed, low-tech solutions are becoming new again, but with a clever technological twist.

—Sam Lubell

Material

Is it possible for sustainable systems to be both high- and low-tech at the same time? That’s the question architects are answering with a resounding “Yes,” thanks to advanced, but somehow simple, passive strategies that rely on new materials. One of the most publicized solutions is New York–based raad studio’s Lowline Lab, a heavily planted public space—still early in development—that will be located in a historic trolley terminal under the streets of Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

In order to bring natural light into the space, the team is using what they call a “remote skylight,” in which sunlight passes through a glass shield to a parabolic collector, where it’s reflected and gathered at one focal point, then transmitted onto a “solar canopy,” a reflective surface underground. The technology transmits the necessary light wavelengths to enable plants and trees to grow in the underground space. A motorized optical system (likely to be powered by photovoltaics) tracks maximum sunlight throughout the day, and the solar canopy carefully distributes light evenly throughout the space.

Raad principal James Ramsey likened the system, which uses a series of relay lenses and mirrors, to both a telescope and a plumbing system. “You’ve almost treated the light as if you’ve turned it into a liquid,” he said. “It’s only geometry. That kind of simplicity is very efficient, and there’s something elegant about that.” All these technologies, added Ramsey, are still in development, so a specific system has not been finalized. He hopes to have it nailed down in the next couple of years.

French firm studioMilou’s reimagining of the National Gallery in Singapore consists of a roof and “veil” that unite two renovated historic buildings while creating a new courtyard. It’s another passive wonder that draws even, dappled light and keeps the buildings and their new public space cool. It mimics one of the oldest systems in the universe: a tree, with its thousands of branches stemming outward. The veil starts above the existing buildings and swoops down around them, filtering and softening natural light through thousands of laminated fritted glass and perforated aluminum panels, creating a filigree structure that also marks the new main entrance. All is supported by large aluminum columns, which effectively serve as tree trunks.

The goal, the French architects said, is for the roof and veil to resemble a handcrafted rattan tapestry. To execute the simple but complex form, the firm scanned the entire space and created a detailed 3-D model, working the roof and veil into the complex geometries of the space and even adjusting panels to fit and avoid the existing facade cornices. Each aluminum panel (chosen for its light weight and rust resistance) can be removed if maintenance is needed.

Meanwhile, Phoenix-based Wendell Burnette Architects’ (WBA) Desert Courtyard House uses a simple, reductive system to create a memorable space in a Sonoran Desert community near Phoenix while also being naturally sustainable. The house, which wraps around a courtyard containing volcanic rock, Saguaro cacti, and desert trees, is located in a low-lying area. It consists of about eight percent locally sourced cement (constituting the raised base) and 92 percent rammed earth excavated from the site. All of the extracted soil was used for the thick walls—none was taken away from the site and none was imported from elsewhere. The peripheral walls range from 3.5 to 18 inches thick, their high thermal mass keeping the home cool—although air conditioning can be used on particularly hot days. Another natural cooling system is the folded, wood-framed Cor-ten steel roof, which conducts heat up and out, creating a chimney effect.

The heavy, almost cave-like palette continues throughout the house, creating a unique aesthetic that Burnette said “feels ancient, primal, and modern at the same time.” He added, “You experience this as a shelter in a very elemental way.”

—Sam Lubell

For more “Passive Aggressive” articles, explore: Bjarke Ingels Group’s own tech-driven think tank, how WORKac’s Arizona House revives the super sustainable Earthship typologyMOS Architects' Michael Meredith on sustainability, and our brief, unofficial history of recent passive-aggressive design.

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Product> Interior Glass: Eight new products and their beautiful special effects
Fixed or floating, glass panels can bring color, pattern, texture, and spatial definition to an interior—without impeding the spread of light throughout the space. Used as part of a wayfinding or identity scheme, or simply to introduce a note of artistic distinction, the choices range from traditional cast and mouth-blown design to high-tech fabrications. Lasercut Poured Glass 3Form An interlayer of laser-cut fabric gives these laminated glass panels depth and dimension. Offered in four patterns in over 40 colors. Moonstone Lumicor Composed of glass aggregate that is 98 percent to 100 percent recycled post-industrial or post-consumer content, these panels are LEED eligible. Isola Murano Glass Soli Combining the art of traditional glass blowing with modern technology, these one-of-a-kind panels can be cut to spec or installed as whole pieces. Graph, Alexander Girard Collection Skyline Design One of ten designs in the new Alexander Girard Collection, panels are available in sizes up to 72 inches by 144 inches, in four thicknesses. Patterns are etched or printed in transparent, translucent, or opaque effects. Scrimshaw Pulp Studio Sporting sketchy linear patterns in a freehand technique, this etched mirror glass is suited for hospitality and commercial applications. Creanza Encast, Creanza Interiors Collection Cristacurva Interlayers of fabrics, metallic mesh, and rice paper give this line of laminated glass a natural character. Dichroic Glass Finishes 3M Architectural Markets Glass is easily transformed using this pressure-sensitive, repositionable film. Available in warm and cool color palettes, it is Class A fire-rated. Plank Joel Berman Glass Studio Available in panels up to 58 inches by 110 inches, this kiln-cast glass can be fabricated, tempered, and color-matched to order.
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Product> Master Glass Solutions for Interiors and Facades
As the buzzword "transparency" gains greater meaning in product specification, glass is an energy-saving, sustainable, and aesthetically pleasing option. Strand 3form 3form’s Pressed Glass is newly available in the Strand pattern (above), a compressed interlayer of fine gauge threads in three monochromatic colorways. It can be further customized through color matching, etching, and fritting options. Available in widths as large as 
48 inches and lengths of 120 inches, it can be specified in either a 5/16-inch or 1 5/16-inch gauge thickness. Its inherent strength meets ANSI Z97.1 standards. DF-PA Dichroic Film 3M Architectural Markets 3M’s Dichroic films can be applied to any smooth surface with a pressure sensitive adhesive; the DF-PA is recommended for glass applications. Two color values—Chill and Blaze—span color ranges from blue to magenta to gold, in either a fully covered opacity, or as a decorative graphic. Durability complies with interior and exterior use, and the film can be easily removed from architectural screens, window fronts, curtain walls, or glazing when it is time for an update. Railings and Floors CARVART This structural laminated glass can be safely specified for floors and railings. Flooring can be installed as a freestanding finish or incorporated into another system with specially engineered mounting hardware, and stair treads can appear to “float” or integrate into stringers. For railings, top and side mounting options can be affixed to most structures, or can be suspended from coordinating adjustable point fittings. Railing caps are available in round, oval, or square profiles. Alice General Glass Digital printing directly to glass provides customization options as broad as the imagination of the architect or designer. Bespoke patterns or imagery can be specified, in addition to a selection of bright and monochromatic colors and patterns for glazing, curtain walls, or interior applications. Fully opaque backing is also available, enhancing the contrast and crispness of any printed design. SunGuard Super Neutral 68 Triple Glaze Guardian Industries Guardian SunGuard SuperNeutral 68 glazing offers improved solar control and abundant natural light. The Valley View project shown here uses SunGuard SN 68 triple glaze, providing a visible light transmission of 52 percent and a solar heat gain coefficient of 0.32. SunGuard SN 68 can also be laminated for noise reduction and hurricane protection. KnollTextiles Glass Collection Skyline Design Seven designs from KnollTextiles are rendered on glass through two production techniques:
Eco-etch achieves varying levels of opacity, and AST Digital Glass Printing introduces color to partial transparency. These options provide for customization of classic patterns 
like Divine and Enchantment, designed by Dorothy Cosonas, or the mid-century Cyclone and Fibra, designed by Eszter Haraszty. Liquidkristal Lasvit Designed by Ross Lovegrove, Liquidkristal was inspired by dynamic forms found in nature. The design was first modeled digitally to simulate thermo induction, which can imbue the qualities of water to glass under very high temperatures. A large-scale mold system was formed from the study’s results, to produce multiple pattern variations over multiple sheets. In addition to interior applications, Liquidkristal is also suitable for glazing and facades. Olivia Joel Berman Glass Studios The circular, three-dimensional pattern of Olivia is enhanced with subtle reflectivity to inflect motion into any space. Back painting options are available in a range of colors on panels measuring 53 by 108 inches. Produced for interior applications, it can be tempered for safety and impact resistance on exteriors as well. ClearShade Glazing Unit Panelite A honeycomb-like insert fits between two sheets of glass and redirects up to 70 
percent of natural light, reducing solar glare and heat gain for midday-SHGC measurements 
as low as 0.11. The cellular configuration is made from a durable but transparent polymer that is resistant to UV rays. The product’s bi-directional scattering distribution capabilities are compatible with Radiance, Energy Plus, and SketchUp modeling programs. Sungate 600 PPG This double-glazed insulated glass unit boasts an efficient configuration tailored to the region of application. In climates where heat gain is optimal, coating on the Number 3 
surface blocks heat loss for a U-value of 0.33, while maintaining a 0.65 SHGC and visible light transmittance of 71 percent. For higher insulation values, the Sungate 600 coating can be placed on the Number 4 surface when combined with a solar control low-e glass, for a net gain in U-value of 20 percent. SageGlass Simplicity Sage Electrochromics This electronically tintable glazing is available in a solar-powered, wireless format. In lieu of low-voltage wired connections, a strip of solar photovoltaics interfaces with a low-profile electronic controller and battery pack that can provide power for up to two days without a charge. The wireless system also configures with light and building management programs from Siemens, Lutron, Schneider, and Johnson Controls. Bistro Green Vetrazzo Vetrazzo, the recycled glass division of Polycor, has been diverting glass from the waste stream since 1996. The surfacing material uses consumer beverage containers, waste from glass manufacturers, building demolition, traffic light lenses, windshields, shower doors, and more. It takes nearly 1,000 bottles to make one 5- by 9-foot panel that is 85 percent glass by volume and bound with Portland Cement. Sixteen of Vetrazzo’s product lines are Cradle to Cradle certified. Dynamic Glass View Glass Insulated glass units as large as 5 feet by 10 feet feature programmable electrochromic levels of 60, 40, 20, and 4 percent tinting with user controls from a smart device app to reduce heating and cooling loads, electric lighting, and solar glare. An intelligent setting can be programmed for sensory occupancy to optimize energy usage as well as user comfort. All four tint levels can be achieved in one unit, with adjustment times akin to the passing of a cloud overhead.
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Timber Towers
Courtesy MGA

Concrete and steel enabled the advent of the skyscraper, and in just about a century they helped that form reach mountainous heights. But these materials have an environmental impact that can’t be ignored. That fact is driving a new generation of designers to reconsider wood.

Concrete and steel production is responsible for about 8 percent of the world’s emissions of carbon dioxide, the greenhouse gas mainly to blame for climate change. The majority of both materials go to fuel the construction boom in China, which nearly doubled its use of steel in the last ten years.

Courtesy MGA
 

Asia’s ongoing building boom is mostly in response to the extreme demand for housing created by its growing and rapidly urbanizing population. More than a billion people will move or be born into Asian cities in the next 20 years. Billions more are already homeless or living in slums. While the density of high-rise living cuts down on transportation and energy emissions, the carbon content of concrete and steel somewhat tempers the savings.

Looking at a California redwood, which can stand nearly 40 stories tall, it is not hard to imagine a wood structure reaching such heights. And its carbon profile is not just less than competing materials; it is potentially carbon negative. As the poet Bill Yakes wrote, “Trees are our lungs turned inside out.” That is, they grow by drinking up carbon dioxide, exhaling oxygen in return. Every cubic meter of wood stores more than three quarters of a ton of carbon.

Top and Above: Michael Green Architect designed the all timber Wood Innovation Design Center with a charred wood facade. It uses cross-laminated timber and is designed for possible future expansion.
Courtesy MGA
 

Canadian firm Michael Green Architecture just broke ground on what, at seven stories with plans to expand to 20, will be the tallest wood building in North America. Designers in Europe and Australia have also gone above wood’s traditional three- or four-story limits. But in the U.S.—where code constraints, economics, and a social stigma prevent construction—the idea has been slower to catch on.

Since they helped set off a flurry of interest in the topic of tall wood construction about ten years ago, a pioneering few designers and engineers have seized on the potential of manufacturing breakthroughs to give one of the world’s oldest construction materials new life. They say urbanization, population, and climate change are on course for a head-on collision that architects have a responsibility to help avert, and wood construction is how.

Whitmore Road, a multi-story project also using cross-laminated timber, was designed by Waugh Thistelton.
Courtesy Waugh Thistleton
 

Seeds to buildings

When British architects Waugh Thistleton set out to build the Stadthaus building, now called the Graphite Apartments, in the east London borough of Hackney, they weren’t stacking two-by-fours.

Apart from a reinforced concrete plinth and fiber-cement facade panels, the entire building is made from cross-laminated timber (CLT). Essentially huge wood sections that behave like shear walls, CLT panels were the first in a series of material advances that opened up design possibilities for tall timber. Manufacturers like KLH Massivholz in Austria, where 80 percent of CLT is still made, pile up sheets of wood at 90-degree angels and paste or glue them together into something resembling a jumbo piece of plywood.

“Our biggest job talking to code officials and the fire department was making sure they distinguished between stick-frame and CLT,” said principal Andrew Waugh. “You’re dealing with a more solid robust material. With a stick-frame system you’re relying on the guy on site.”

CLT is assembled in the factory, which cuts down on construction errors and time. The Graphite Apartments, a nine-story mixed-use building, was built in just under one year—months less than expected.

   
The Whitmore Road Project.
Courtesy Waugh Thistleton
 

A layer of drywall over the thick CLT panels helped the structure earn a fire resistance rating between 60 and 90 minutes, passing code. Heavy timber and cross-laminated timber actually have built-in fire protection; dense wood will burn slowly, charring instead of catching fire all at once. Part of bringing a wood building up to code is providing enough wood so that even after fire produces a “char layer,” there is still enough left to support the structure.

On Green’s forthcoming Wood Innovation Design Center in Vancouver, a pre-charred cedar exterior dramatically improved its fire rating.

Acoustics, another traditional failing of wood construction, is also heartier in CLT towers. An air gap, compressed insulation, and a floor slab totaling about 14 inches overall helped the Graphite Apartments meet stringent UK acoustics requirements.

CLT is not produced in the U.S., nor are newer iterations of high-rise-ready timber panels, like laminated strand lumber (LSL) or laminated veneer lumber (LVL). But as more high-rises are built with wood, Waugh hopes his firm will find a U.S. client.

“The more you build with timber, the more you realize how steeped in concrete we really are,” he said. “It’s still a relatively conservative industry, the construction industry, but when contractors build one they want to build more.”

Waugh built his own CLT home with three friends. He said the wood imparts an emotional value. “It’s a beautiful place to live. You know you’re living in a space captured by a natural material.”

A proposal for a 34-story residential tower for Stockholm by Berg | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson.
Courtesy BERG | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson
 

Timber towers

Michael Green, Waugh Thistleton, and several European firms—Berg | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson have proposed a 34-story “ultra-modern residential high-rise building” for Stockholm—are the face of the timber tower movement, but they recently added a company from the old guard of skyscraper design to their ranks: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill.

When SOM engineers first floated the idea of a 20-story wood tower, one partner’s response wasn’t the skepticism one might expect from a master of steel-and-concrete structural systems. “Do 30,” he reportedly told them.

“It’s a high standard. We wanted to set a high benchmark,” SOM’s Bill Baker told AN. They chose the 1965 DeWitt-Chestnut Apartment Building in Chicago as their standard, the first building in the world to use the “framed tube” structural system devised by SOM engineer Fazlur Khan.

 
Courtesy BERG | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson
 

“We wanted to show not just that it was possible,” said SOM’s Benton Johnson, “but make it competitive with concrete.”

The prototype isn’t pure wood. A concrete core and joints mean the system uses about one quarter as much concrete as the actual Dewitt-Chestnut. Structural steel anchors the building at its base, using about 15 percent as much steel as a typical composite system.

SOM’s report examined five schemes with varying amounts of timber, steel, and concrete, trying to replicate the landmark building’s structure. They focused on reducing the weight of the floors, where most of the material weight is contained. Wood high-rises already built in Europe, such as the Graphite Apartments in London, use a lot of load-bearing walls to hold up the structure. But that would limit the building owner’s options for renters, Johnson said, as would the immovable columns placed throughout.

The architects believe that all wood interiors are more inviting than those in similar steel and concrete structures.
Courtesy BERG | C.F. Møller Architects and Dinell Johansson
 

To make the Dewitt-Chestnut system work without drastically shrinking the floorplate or beefing up the structural system, SOM zeroed in on what engineers call the boundary condition—its mathematical pressure point. To illustrate, Johnson built two stacks of tile samples and placed a ruler on top to span the distance between. He balanced a can of soda water on the ruler, the building’s floor in this example. The ruler bowed beneath its weight, but its edges also flared up, making a slight u-shape. But with a few more tiles placed on each stack to pin down the ruler, it held its shape.

In his example, the ruler is a solid timber floor, while the tile stacks are reinforced concrete wall joints and beams. Without concrete, SOM’s engineers determined the Dewitt-Chestnut would need custom 13.5-inch CLT panels to support the floorplate’s core-to-window span. That would be too expensive and would use more material in just the floors than the whole of the original building.

“It just started solving all these problems for us,” Johnson said. “You have the concrete to hold it all together—basically all this timber coming together and concrete sealing it at the joints.”

It would take about 12 million cubic yards of timber to build, the report estimated—less than one-hundredth of one percent of the annual North American timber harvest.

 
SOM’s proposal for a 40-story timber tower with a concrete core is based on a structural system designed by Fazlur Kahn in 1965.
Courtesy SOM
 

Scaling back

Even if engineers can solve these problems, there is still a stigma involved with tall wood structures. Antony Wood, executive director of the Council on Tall Buildings and Urban Habitat, counted timber towers among the “quiet revolutions” happening in tall building design.

“I think the fear of timber is that it’s an organic material,” he said. “It’s not manufactured to provide a structural member like steel or concrete is.”

Wood rots, so it must be kept out of the rain. SOM’s system swaps wood for a steel frame at the building’s base to prevent water damage during flooding.

Courtesy SOM
 

Most critics worry about fire. Tall timber skeptics seized on a structural fire at the job site of a six-story wood building in Richmond, British Columbia, in 2011. In the city just south of Vancouver, what would have been the first wood-frame six-story building in Canada burned to the ground on May 3. Steel companies were quick to blame the wood frame’s flammability. But Canadian Wood Council President Michael Giroux pushed back, noting the construction team hadn’t yet installed safety features, including fire sprinklers.

“To suggest that the outcome of the May 3 fire at the Remy project in Richmond would have been the same if the building had been fully completed, is not plausible,” he wrote.

Even tall timber’s champions concede the material isn’t suitable for super-tall buildings. But they say building codes, which in many places restrict wood to only low-rise construction, isn’t up to date with structural engineering advancements.

“It’s time to reconvene and reconsider what we’re doing,” Waugh said. “We need to densify our cities to leave ground for agriculture and wildlife. Condensed cities are much more efficient places. But I don’t think these Babel-sized towers are the way.”

And some go as far as to say the threat of climate change means wood high-rises are our only choice.

Wood world

In 2009, the government of British Columbia endorsed a “culture of wood,” requiring designers of public buildings to prove they can not use wood before considering other materials. With millions of acres of forests in the U.S. and Canada devastated by mountain pine beetles, it was a prudent move for a province home to one of the world’s busiest forestry sectors.

But if wood construction is going to take off on the scale envisioned by its pioneering architects, Michael Green said, the “wood first” policy will have to become “carbon first.”

“We need to create incentives around climate change instead of seeing it all as a hindrance,” he told AN. “Let all industries benefit—it allows the concrete and steel industries to make their case. By no means is one exclusive of the other. Let’s use all materials where it’s most appropriate.”

While at MGB (mcfarlane green biggar ARCHITECTURE + DESIGN), Green released an open source platform for wood tower construction—a structural system to engineer tall buildings 12, 20, or 30 stories high. Several iterations later, his wood-based structural systems have started a conversation in Vancouver, where he is based.

Green said the warmth of wood interiors and scaling back the height of buildings could help solve another problem of modern high-rise construction: social sustainability. Whereas many residential skyscrapers are isolating, new typologies developed with wood in mind—not traditional forms grafted onto wood frames—could change the mindset.

As with British Columbia’s “wood first” policy, the UK’s performance-based code has created an opportunity for timber construction, while U.S. code remains constrictive. But it wasn’t novelty that ultimately built Waugh Thistleton’s Graphite Apartments. At a cost of about $2,200 per square foot, the building was 15 percent cheaper than if it had been made from concrete.

By 2050, concrete use is predicted to reach four times its 1990 level. And production of steel and concrete are on track to balloon, eclipsing advances in recycling and materials science that could shrink their carbon footprints.

“We need to really hit reboot on how we build environments,” Green said. “As architects we owe it to ourselves to push these boundaries.”

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Product> Can Touch This: Coverings and Surfaces
From floor to ceiling, and all planes in between, these interior surfacing solutions are durable and work across a variety of applications. I Frammenti Brix This micro mosaic of 2,304, 5-millimeter-square ceramic blocks on a 12- by 12-inch sheet of fine mesh provides a full range of flexibility, perfect for finishing curved or irregular walls. Available in both glossy and matte treatments, I Frammenti comes in mixed colors of sand, gray, and black; blue, white, and azure; white, gray, and black; white, sand, and black; and blue, gray, and azure. DI-NOC 3M Architectural Markets The color and texture of a naturally unwieldy material can be applied to irregular or gravity-defying surfaces with an 8-millimeter architectural vinyl film from 3M (above). The lightweight material comes in rolls for a smooth application and can be heat-stretched over corners and sharp edges for a monolithic look. It comes in more than 500 patterns and textures, thanks to a combination of digital printing and embossing techniques. Pyne Arborite A bold, graphic faux bois is rendered on high-pressure laminate for Pyne, one of three patterns in the INK series. Designed by Giona Maiarelli, the pattern is a wink to his Italian view of 1960s America, refined by years of graphic work for the likes of Milton Glaser and Harper’s Bazaar. The product comes in 4- by 8-foot panels and is available in inverse combinations of Purple and Orange. Biobased Xorel Carnegie Seven years of research went into reimagining the Xorel line of wall coverings and upholstery fabric—traditionally a petroleum-based product—in sugar cane. The U.S. government grants a bio-based label to any product with at least 25 percent biomaterial, but Xorel is composed of between 60 and 80 percent sugar. Ninety-one colors are available in three existing and three new patterns. SilentMesh GKD Metal Fabrics GKD has developed a ceiling solution from its line of metal fabrics. The multi-layered system features a lightweight aluminum honeycomb core that is stable, sound absorbing, and maintains strong architectural edges and finishing details. While large-format panels are compatible with the drop ceiling framework prevalent in North America, it also comes with a custom T-grid suspension system for clean, flush seams that conceal traditional joints. Deconstructed Patcraft Deconstructed embraces the foundation of carpet. It integrates the backing of either a modular or broadloom format into the face of the floor covering. Monochromatic thread fibers at varying heights are variegated by exposing the matrix pad for pops of color and texture. The product is material efficient, lightweight, and soft. All components are 100 percent recyclable and Cradle-to-Cradle certified. Krion Porcelanosa Aluminum trihydride and highly resistant resins form an antibacterial and durable surfacing material that is highly resistant to UV radiation, fire damage, staining, and extreme environmental exposure. It can be cut similar to wood or marble, scored for dramatic backlighting, and thermoformed for seamless corners and irregular shapes. Warm to the touch, Krion is available in nearly 50 colors and styles, including a white that boasts more than 99.8 percent purity. Maglia Pulp Studio To achieve a smoother surface than traditional woven metal materials with additional sound-blocking capabilities, Pulp Studio developed Maglia, a laminated glass sheet embedded with architectural mesh for interior applications. Low-iron glass highlights metallic details in both annealed and tempered formats while complying with Category I and II of the Consumer Product Safety Commission standards. Any of Pulp Studio’s meshes are available and custom weaves can also be specified.
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Beyond Transparency



courtesy weiss/manfredi architects

BARNARD NEXUS
New York, 2009
Weiss/Manfredi Architects


The word contextuall strikes fear in the hearts of many architects, not because sensitivity to one's surroundings is a bad thing, but because its definition has proved to be so elastic, and even political. At one end of the spectrum, there is Prince Charles and his advocacy for 19th-century buildings with 21st-century technology; others argue that scale, massing, and material should be the central concerns for architects working within a developed site. For an arts building for the Barnard College campus, New York's Weiss/ Manfredi Architects is making a strong argument for the latter approach. When the Barnard Nexus is complete in 2009, it should show that sensibility can be more faithful to context than duplication: Instead of using the red brick that characterizes many of the college's older buildings, the architects riff on brick's color and material qualities. The steel-framed building will have a glass curtain wall whose surface suggests the spectrum of tone and texture inherent to brick.

Weiss/Manfredi won an invited competition to design a new arts library at Barnard in 2004 based on a design that would rectify the longstanding problem of a dramatic grade change between Broadway and the edge of the campus at 119th Street that created an unfriendly wall along the street. Two ideas were central to their early schemes: The first was to draw the public green space up diagonally through the building, making it visible from outside; the second was to develop a curtain wall that was a mixture of terra cotta panels and glass. The terra cotta would be a gesture of solidarity towards Milbank Hall (1896) next door, while the transparency of the glass would let the building light up its corner of the green and encourage students to use it as a social space as well as an academic one. As the design process progressed, however, they began to consider different materials. Principal Marion Weiss described making a series of charcoal sketches of the facade and getting interested in the blurred quality it gave to the panels: When we were working with terra cotta and clear glass, it was either figure or ground,, she explained, but the charcoal suggested a less definite line. Sometimes the tools you use are suggestive, and it is important to be able to capture the quality of an accident..

The project team began to look at glass and different ways of using it. They developed a system whereby the colored glass panels would be backed by a shallow cavity closed off by sheetrock, which they began to refer to as a shadow box. This gap (which is still being determined, but could be anywhere from 3 to 5 inches) is clearly perceptible as sunlight passes through it; the vertical supports, which will be painted, read as somewhat darker, and give definition and depth to the cavity, Like luminous terra cotta,, as Weiss described it. They are still experimenting with the shade of the sheetrock back panel, and Weiss said that it may well change over the course of the building in order to give more texture to the faaade. Partner Michael Manfredi described bringing endless samples to the roof of the building and seeing how one piece of colored glass looked 3 inches away from the back panel versus 5, or with white sheetrock behind it versus colored. The deeper the shadow box,, Weiss said, the more expensive it is, but it is also a richer effect..

Weiss/Manfredi found a company that could acid-etch or bake color onto the number 1 [exterior] surface of a glass panel. Usually the frit is on the number 2 or 3 surface, so the exterior is still highly reflective,, explained Weiss. The acid-etched frit gives a softer matte texture to the glass surface. Another issue was color: It is often laminated between two sheets, but the problem is that you are paying for more glass, and because the panel is heavier, the curtain wall structure has to be stronger.. The pattern on the facade loosely follows Nexus' more public spaces, which form a diagonal path through the building and terminate in a rooftop garden. To standardize construction, they developed a five-foot module, but have been able to give the faaade a finer overall grain by using more or less frit as needed. Mindful of the lessons of the charcoal sketch, the transitions from clear to opaque are rarely abrupt. Glass is typically treated as a neutral skin, and architects want to dematerialize it and make it go away,, said Weiss. We got interested in its presence and potential for decorative richness.. Anne guiney is an editor at AN.



Below: Weiss / Manfredi photographed various glass samples on the roof of their office in order to better understand the way shadowboxes of different depths would affect color and opacity in sunlight.



Below: Shadow Box Detail Section
1 Extruded aluminum transom, painted
2 Insulated glass unit
3 Shadow box
4 Finished concrete topping slab
5 Extruded aluminum stack joint, painted
6 Painted metal spandrel panel
7 Pocket slab at anchors




Below: Exploded axonometric showing the Nexus' primary circulation route (blue), the open, public spaces which are an extension of the campus green outside (green), and the gradations of colored, fritted, and clear glass panels which clad the exterior (grayscale).



courtesy weiss/manfredi architects


CREDITS
Owner: Barnard College, New York

Architect: Weiss/Manfredi Architects, New York

Consultant(s)
M/E/P/FP:Jaros, Baum & Bolles, New York
Structural: Severud Associates, New York
Civil: Langan Engineering, New York
Landscape: HM White Site Architects
Lighting: Brandston Partnership, Inc, New York
Food Service: Ricca Newmark Design, New York
Theater: Fisher Dachs Associates, New York
Theater Acoustics: Jaffe Holden Acoustics, Norwalk, CT
Glazing: R.A. Heintges & Associates, New York
AV/IT/Acoustics/Security: Cerami & Associates, New York
AV/IT/Security: TM Technology Partners, New York
Pre-Construction Services: Bovis Lend Lease, New York

GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS
Mullion/Metal Cladding: Custom color three coat fluoropolymer metallic finish.
Exterior Glazing: Four-sided structurally glazed unitized aluminum system.
Multiple combinations of clear low-e (low iron), etched glass, etched tinted glass, and color translucent ceramic frit.

Roofing
Built-up roofing: Hydrotech garden roof system consisting of lawn and low-maintenance sedum.

Glazing
Glass: Interior Glazing: Glazed system with custom graphic interlayer.
Skylights: Custom translucent etched walkable surface set into pavement.

TOLEDO MUSEUM OF ART GLASS PAVILION
Toledo, Ohio, 2006
Kazuyo Sejima +
Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA


Like its pristine Miesian predecessors, the Toledo Museum of Art's new Glass Pavilion is seductively light and deceptively simple. It appears to be a straightforward glass box under a flat roof, but unlike the Barcelona Pavilion or the Farnsworth House, this building houses a series of discrete spaces that serve a wide range of programs including a caff, exhibition space for light-sensitive objects, and a workshop for glass artists. The Tokyo-based firm SANAA has used this programmatic diversity to push the possibilities of a glass pavilion in both scale and ambition. For the firm's many admirers, the projecttSANAA's first in North Americaais an amplification of the work they have become known for, like the Kanazawa Museum of Contemporary Art, which also uses curved glass and simple massing strategies.

Within the pavilion's all-glass rectangular box, 13 glass volumes float almost bubblelike in plan and act as various gallery, event, and exhibition spaces. The programmatic requirements for the space were the primary generator for SANAA's emphasis on discrete volumes in the project, explained principal Ryue Nishizawa. Our design came from the museum itself: Different temperatures and humidities were needed for various rooms, including a hotshop that generates an enormous amount of heat. Also, it is a big place [76,000 square feet] and we needed to break up the space.. Between most volumes are interstitial spaces that act as insulating pockets, further regulating the interior conditions of the galleries.

While minimalism is often thought of as stripping down and removing the inessential, it is just as much about hiding the unappealing but necessary. In this case, SANAA embedded most of the structural columns within the four rooms which are not glass encloseddthree are built with standard a wood frame and sheetrock, and the fourth is clad in rolled steel. Slender columns are scattered throughout the interstitial cavities, but sited to obstruct sightlines minimally. To avoid disrupting the irregularly spaced and sized rooms, the firm, with structural engineers Guy Nordensen & Associates, planned an intricate roofing system to accommodate mechanical systems and maximize structural capacity without requiring a regular column grid. They managed this by using differently sized beams that worked around the columns and HVAC systems, all of which were locked into perpendicular girders through flanges. Given that the roof is only 24 inches from top to bottom, it required coordination between the structural and mechanical drawings,, described SANAA project manager Toshihiro Oki. Also, they used -inch plate steel on the corners of the building to act as bracing for lateral loads. This allowed the columns to be smaller and support only vertical loads.

The 13-foot-high glass panels which define most of the volumes had to be shipped from Austria to a plant in China and custom-formed through a slumpingg process, in which the glass is placed above a curved mold and then heated until it settles into place. The glass panels are flat, fully, or partially curved, and while many are different, the designers tried to standardize some of the curvatures in the building. Oki estimated that approximately 30 different molds had to be fabricated to create the panels.

These panels are slotted into tracks on the floor and ceiling. The lower tracks are embedded into the structural concrete floor with 3-inch slabs, and employ a U-track system with a rocker device at the bottom of each track to allow the glass panels some degree of movement. The rocking mechanism is stainless steel, and has a shallow parabolic shape. This keeps the glass level and vertical, and the flexibility minimizes the potential for breakage. The top track employs Teflon slip-plates to minimize friction and allow the glass to move slightly based on vertical loads. An L-shaped -inch steel plate is locked into place after the glass is installed to hold the panel in place.

This support system is both stable and flexible, allowing the system to respond to external factors without discernible effect on the panels, which, with many measuring 8 by 13-feet, are quite large. The designers used low-iron, Pilkington Opti-white glass in order to minimize green tint and provide colorless transparency, and also to acknowledge their interest in manipulating that transparency: We realized that curved glass would transfer light differently, and also transparency would change in the building just through the layering of glass,, said principal Kazuyo Sejima. In the mock-up we built, even two layers created a certain level of opacity..

While the firm has worked with curving glass before, Toledo's Glass Pavilion allowed a new kind of experimentation. We were able to work with much thinner glass in Ohio than in Japan,, noted Sejima. The result is both greater clarity and more precision with the forms. The building is a perfect vessel to showcase glass, itself a feat, but as Sejima commented, the material may be fragile, but working with it is really no big deal..
Jaffer Kolb is an assistant editor at AN
.

SANAA built a full-scale mockup (center) of the Toledo Museum of Art's Glass Pavilion (bottom) to test the visual effect of layering the glass walls, which were slumpedd on frames (center right) in China and are held in place by track inset into the concrete floor (top right).



courtesy kazuyo seijima + ryue nishizawa / sanaa

Below: Ground Floor Plan
1 Permanent exhibition
2 Temporary exhibition
3 Hotshop
4 Lampworking room
5 Restaurant/cafe
6 Courtyard
7 Restrooms
8 Support space
9 Multi-purpose room




Below: Glass Track Details, Head and Shoe
1 Primaryroof structure
2 Shim
3 1⁄2" Steel plate
4 Head support steel angle
5 Stainless steel head support plate
6 Teflon slip pad
7 Neoprene load transfer block
8 3⁄8" + 3⁄8" Laminated glass with PVB interlayer
9 Finished floor
10 Silicone sealant
11 Stainless steel glazing channel
12 Glass support rocking mechanism
13 Shim
14 Blocking





CREDITS
Owner:Toledo Museum of Art, Toledo, OH

Design Architect: Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa/SANAA, Tokyo

Architect of Record: Kendall Heaton Associates, Inc., Houston

Structural Engineer: Guy Nordenson & Associates, New York Sasaki and Partners, Tokyo
MEP Engineer: Cosentini Associates, New York
Lighting: Arup Lighting, New York Kilt Planning Group, Tokyo
Curtain Wall Engineer: FRONT, Inc., New York
Civil Engineer: The Mannik & Smith Group, Inc., Toledo, OH
Geotechnical Engineer: Bowser Morner, Toledo, OH
Acoustical/AV: Harvey Marshall Berling Associates, New York

Landscape: Neville Tree & Landscape, Holland, Ohio
Glassmaking facility consultant: Spiral Arts, Inc., Seattle, WA
Lampworking consultant: Glasscraft, Inc., Golden, CO
Graphics: 2x4 (NYC)
Project Manager: Paratus Group, New York
General Contractor: Rudolph/Libbe, Walbridge, OH

GLASS SPECIFICATIONS
Glass: Pilkington Opti-White
Glass Fabricator: SanXin Glass Technology, Shenzhen, China
Glass doors & structural calculations: UAD Group, New York
Local glass installers: Toledo Mirror and Glass, Toledo, OH
Aluminum fascia anodizers: TRB-Andarn, Paterson, NJ


DETAIL
7 WORLD TRADE CENTER

New York, 2006
Skidmore Owings & Merrill


According to Chris Cooper of Skidmore Owings & Merrill, creating an all-glass building in New York City is a lot harder than it seems, especially while trying to work within the financial constraints of a speculative office tower like 7 World Trade Center. In Europe, it is becoming more and more common to use a double skin. As we were thinking about how to brighten the exterior while still using standard construction techniques, we reached out to Jamie Carpenter of James Carpenter Design Associates (JCDA), and together we looked at ways to bring light into the spandrels.. The solution the two firms ultimately came up with is a system whereby the window glass hangs over the finished edge of the floor slab, which is clad in galvanized steel panels. The resulting cavityywhich is open to the air, as each glass panel covers only 11 of the 33-foot slab depthhallows the glass to seemingly lighten the building's facade between floors . Clear glass with space behind it is always brighter,, said Cooper. To subtly increase that effect, they added a strip of blue stainless steel to the base of the sill. You can't see it, but the blue steel tempers the quality of the light as it reflects it,, explained Cooper.

Because SOM decided to use single-glazed windows on 7 WTC, there was concern that the spandrel detail would cause the glass to lose its insulating value: For 11 feet, each pane would be exposed to the weather on both sides, and presumably conduct the cold in. Before glass manufacturer Viracon would sign off on the system, it conducted a temperature distribution analysis, as did SOM and two other consultants. All four found that, while the glass felt cold to the touch, heat transferrand its attendant condensation insideecould be kept to a minimum by insulating the spandrel and using thermal separators. AG



Below: Spandrel Detail
1 3/88 Glazing with PVB interlayer
2 Spacer
3 Thermal separator
4 Blocking
5 Aluminum mullion
6 Insulation
7 Steel fascia
8 Blue stainless Steel strip
9 Gasket
10 Gutter splice
11 Blind pocket
12 Mullion wrapper



CREDITS
Owner: Silverstein Properties, New York
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York
Collaborating Artist: James Carpenter Design Associates Inc., New York
Construction Manager: Tishman Construction, New York
Structural Engineer: Cantor Seinuk, New York
MEP: Jaros Baum & Bolles, New York
Civil Engineer: Philip Habib & Associates, New York
Lighting Design: Cline Bettridge Bernstein Lighting Design, New York
Signage: Pentagram, New York
Security: Ducbella, Venter & Santore Security, North Haven, CT
Curtain Wall Fabricator: Permasteelisa Cladding Technologies, Windsor, CT
Curtain Wall Installer: Permasteelisa Cladding Technologies, Windsor, CT Curtain Wall Glass: Viracon VRE-59


DETAIL
OFFICE BUILDING & SHOWROOM

Seoul, Korea, 2007
Barkow Leibinger Architekten


When architects Frank Barkow and Regine Leibinger were asked to design a spec office building in an area of Seoul that hadn't even been developed yet, they realized they wouldn't be able to turn to the usual sourcessthe needs of clients, the feel of the neighborhooddto begin the design process. The site is a part of Digital Media City, a government-initiated project that will ultimately be a 2.5-square-mile business center between the airport and downtown Seoul. Since the only truly known quantity they had at the outset of the process was the budget, Barkow Leibinger decided to plan for the worst: The architects developed a highly reflective glazed primary faaade that would, in Barkow's words, take the neighborssno matter how terrible they might beeand pixilate them into coolness.. A mockup they built and put in the courtyard of their Berlin office showed endless fragmented images of the brick building, small triangles of blue sky, and cubist versions of anybody who happened to walk by.

The polygonal geometry of the faaade grew in part from conversations with the artist Olafur Eliasson, who was also working on a piece called the Quasi-Brick Wall that explored likeminded ideas. Eliasson served as an in-house critic for Barkow Leibinger while the Berlin office of Arup helped them turn the idea into a working curtain wall.

For all its kaleidoscopic glory, the 11-story building's plan is actually quite straightforward, and the curtain wall is based on a single module to make construction easier. The primary faaade is comprised of one 4-by-3.3-meter module that is rotated and flipped upside down to create a varied pattern; on the rear of the building, the curtain wall is flat to accommodate the service core, which is pushed to a rear corner to leave interior spaces open enough to accommodate any future tenant. According to Barkow, who has seen full-scale mockups in place on the construction site, It is a shallow, economical section, but when they are put together, there is the sense of being within a volumeethe faaade itself becomes volumetric.. Each of the module's seven surfaces is a piece of highly reflective glass held in place with silicone. The silver-white glass may fracture everything that ultimately passes by it but, promised Barkow, It's low-iron energy glass that lets in 49 percent of the sunlighttit isn't dark, 1970s stuff, like Houston in the bad old days.. AG

Below: A scale mockup of the faceted curtain wall gave a kaleidoscopic reflection of its surroundings, in this case, Barkow Leibinger's Berlin office.



Below: Barkow Leibinger designed an office building (below) for a site in Seoul's new Digital Media City, which is a massive government-initiated development on the outskirts of the city. As one of the earlier projects to go into construction, the only real constraints on the architects were zoning restrictions and budget.



Below: Curtain Wall Detail
1 Steel bracket
2 Anti-glare blind
3 Aluminum interior joint
4 Register with convector
5 Double-glazed glass panels




CREDITS
Client: TKR Sang Am
Design Architect: Barkow Leibinger Architekten, Berlin
Contact Architect: ChangJo Architects, Seoul
Structural Engineer: Schlaich Bergermann and Partners, Stuttgart
Jeon Lee and Partners, Seoul
Curtain Wall Consultant: Arup GmbH, Berlin,
Alutec Ltd., Seoul
Glass manufacturer: Viracon VRE-43


DETAIL
BRONX CRIMINAL COURT COMPLEX

New York, 2006
Rafael Viioly Architects


After the United States Embassies in Kenya and Tanzania were bombed on August 7, 1998, leaving 224 dead and 5,000 injured, the Government Services Administration (GSA) beefed up its blastproofing standards for new construction. Rafael Viioly Architects had already begun design work on the Bronx Criminal Court Complex in New York, and while blast resistance was included in the program, the architects decided to team up with curtain wall fabricator Enclos Corporation to incorporate the GSA's new standards into the all-glass design. The court complex was already under construction when September 11 prompted safety requirements to be raised yet again, but Viioly's building already met most of the new standards, so the architects didn't have to put construction on hold.

The building's primary street-facing curtain wall is a series of triangular protrusions that form a sawtooth shape in plan; structural silicone holds Viracon low-E insulated glass panels in aluminum mullions. We were working with the physics of blasts,, said Fred Wilmers, project architect at Rafael Viioly Architects. They are impulse forces that last a matter of seconds, so a flexible surface that gives with the blast but remains intact, is actually more efficient than a rigid surface.. For example, a 1,000-pounds-per-square-foot blast applied to a rigid surface would produce a much higher-static pressure than the same blast load applied to a flexible surface, like a curtain wall system.

Due to security concerns, Wilmers was unable to speak specifically about the level of blast the court is built to withstand. He did say that the criterion for passing blast force is that glass doesn't fly into the building more than a certain distance. This means that not only does the glass have to stand up to a blast (a PVB interlayer on the interior pane prevents it from shattering), but so does the aluminum and silicone. The sawtooth shape that is so central to the building's aesthetic is also an important component of the curtain wall's blast resistance: Because the blast force would presumably meet the glass at an angle, its impact would be more diffused than on a flat surface. The designers also worked with the assumption that blasts would come from street level, so the wall was designed with a vertical gradient of blast resistance. On lower floors, mullions are reinforced with steel.

Blast resistance is about protecting the people inside the building,, noted Wilmers, not the building itself. After a blast, the outer panes of the glass would be shattered and the aluminum would be distorted, but the people inside wouldn't be hit with shredded aluminum and glass shards. It is for a one-time use, howeverrit couldn't resist a second blast..

The fact that a glass curtain wall is capable of meeting current security requirements is the key lesson of this building. It offers hope that in this age of terrorism, civic structures don't need to be concrete bunkers.
Aaron Seward is projects editor at AN.





Below: Vertical mullion at unit break and outside corner
1 Steel reinforcing plate
2 Painted aluminum mullion
3 Structural silicone
4 Insulated laminated glass unit
5 Painted aluminum corner mullion






CREDITS
Owner: City of New York, Department of Citywide Administrative Services, New York, NY
Developer: Dormitory Authority of the State of New York, New York, NY
Architects: Rafael Viioly Architects PC, New York, NY;
Architects and Engineers, New York, NY
Structural Engineers: Ysrael A. Seinuk, PC, New York, NY
General Contractor: Bovis Lend Lease, LMB, Inc., New York, NY
Curtain Wall Consultant: Gordon H. Smith Corp., New York, NY
Curtain Wall Fabricator: Enclos Corp., Egan, MN
Curtain Wall Erectors: Ornamental Installation Specialists, Warwick, NY
Enclos Corp., Egan, MN