Search results for "stephen b. jacobs"

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Stacks on Stacks

Take a look behind the construction of the tallest modular hotel in the U.S.
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Modular construction is gaining steam in New York City, with the technique being utilized for new projects ranging from affordable housing to academic facilities. In September 2018, modular technology reached a new height with the tallest modular hotel in the United States, the 21-story citizenM New York Bowery located in Manhattan. For the modular units, Concrete Architectural Associates, Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects and Planners, and DeSimone Consulting Engineers reached out to Polish manufacturers Polcom Modular, and Aluprof S.A.  The units, which measure 48 feet by 8 feet by 9 feet and incorporate two hotel rooms and a central corridor (following a pattern of guestroom-corridor-guestroom), were specifically designed to navigate the street width of New York City. Each module was assembled with the street-facing facade included.
  • Facade Manufacturer Aluprof S.A., Poland Polcom Modular
  • Architects Concrete Architectural Associates & Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects and Planners
  • Facade Installer Architectural Building Services
  • Facade Consultants DeSimone Consulting Engineers                  Gilsanz Murray Steficek LLP
  • Location New York
  • Date of Completion September 2018
  • System Mullion/transom captured system with hopper tilt-in windows
  • Products Aluprof MB-SR50 Hi; MB-60l
Following fabrication, the 210 modular units were transported hundreds of miles from the manufacturing facilities in Goleszów, Poland to the northern port city of Gdańsk where they began the second leg of their trip to New York’s Red Hook Terminal. From Brooklyn, a convoy of flatbed trucks transported the units across the East River to the construction site. The project began with the construction of a four-story concrete base, topped with a 36-inch-thick slab that spans up to 38 feet. This podium, which houses larger amenity spaces below, serves as a transfer slab to support the modular pods above. While the bulk of the citizenM New York Bowery hotel is composed of modular units, there are certain structural elements that span the building’s height. Prior to the craning in of prefabricated components, the construction team poured a full-height concrete structural core along the sites southwest corner and a sheer wall to the north. These concrete structural elements are the primary lateral system for the tower, with the sheer wall largely preventing the modular units from twisting. "Diagonal strap bracing on the module ceiling acted as the floor diaphragm to transfer the floor lateral loads back to the sheer walls," said DeSimone Consulting Engineers Managing Principal Borys Hayda, "the sheer wall's steel connection plates were bolted into the module ceilings and the female end of a Halfen stud embedded into the concrete structure." Once on site, the modules were lifted by crane and stacked module-to-module, each tied to the one directly below by bolted connections. According to DeSimone Engineers, "countersunk bolts were typically used for the diaphragm connections to prevent boltheads from interfering with the bearing of the module above." During construction, the prefabricated units were effectively cocooned within a watertight membrane, with the central portion later being cut out for the hotel’s corridors. After a brief learning curve at the start of the project, the construction team was capable of installing one floor of modular units per week. The top two floors of the tower are framed by structural steel, allowing for larger amenity spaces.
 
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A Bit of Polish

CitizenM used modular construction for its newest NYC hotel
CitizenM, the boutique hotel company founded in Amsterdam that prides itself on offering affordable luxury lodging, is opening its second hotel in New York and in the United States this week, on the Bowery on the Lower East Side in a building designed by Stephen B. Jacobs Group. The new hotel will be the brand’s first in the U.S. to use its prefabricated construction system, which no doubt helps make its luxury affordable. According to Rob Wagemans, the brand’s creative director who is also the founder of Concrete, an Amsterdam-based design firm, many citizenM hotels feature modular guest rooms that are prefabricated in a factory north of Gdansk, Poland, and then shipped by sea in containers to the hotels’ location. The Bowery hotel’s 300 165-square-foot prefabricated guest rooms, made of steel, with concrete floors covered with a wood laminate. were shipped containing most of their furniture, all pieces attached to the rooms’ walls or floor. The furniture includes a California king-size bed that is placed directly below the guest room’s window, which is located in one of its walls, and that lies flush against two other walls facing each other; an HD TV, with wiring done in Poland, that is located at the foot of the bed, mounted on the wall; a table next to one wall that contains the room’s iPad, which controls its lighting, blinds, and TV; a Corian vanity on the opposite wall that contains a sink, minibar, and mirror; and table lamps and a George Nelson lamp above the bed. The room’s frosted glassed-in combined shower and toilet space is also prefabricated; appliances here were made in Germany by Hansgrohe and shipped to Poland for installation Not sent by container is the rooms' movable furniture, such as a red-upholstered Eames chair from Vitra with an accompanying bench; decorative and visual art; and toiletries and toilet paper. Each modular unit consists of two guest rooms connected by a hallway, and 210 units were shipped to New York for the Bowery hotel. The hallway carpet here is decorated with local landmarks and was installed on-site. Wagemans said citizenM’s first hotel in the United States—located in Times Square—was not constructed with modular rooms because when it opened in 2014, the New York City Department of Buildings (DOB) would not permit installation of a sprinkler system that was built overseas and not been inspected locally. Robin Chadha, citizenM’s chief marketing officer, said that the administration of New York Mayor Bill de Blasio now looks favorably on prefabrication and is permitting DOB inspectors to go to Europe to inspect sprinklers in citizenM’s modular guest rooms. CitizenM declined to quantify savings afforded by guest room prefabrication, but said the units’ small size means they “generate up to 35 percent more hotel keys per property than a traditional hotel” and undoubtedly more revenue. Not all of the new Bowery hotel was prefabricated. Spaces that were not include the lobby, a ground floor cafe, a “living room” one floor below the first floor, and a rooftop bar with 360-degree views of the city. CitizenM, which owns and operates its 13 hotels worldwide, constructed the 246-feet-tall building the Bowery hotel occupies and claims it is one of the highest in its Lower East Side neighborhood. Eight of the brand’s 13 hotels feature modular guest rooms.
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Second City Assembly

A modular apartment factory is set to touch down in Chicago
Chicago-based general contractors Skender are getting into the modular manufacturing game, with an announcement that they will be building a factory on Chicago’s southwest side that can crank out hotel rooms and entire apartments. Skender is going all in on the new factory and modular fabrication startup, which they claim will put 100 people to work (an impressive number, as Skender only has 300 employees), and is using the opportunity to shift towards a design-build model. The company has bought out local firm Ingenious Architecture and will use the 10-person studio to guide the design and manufacturing of the modular units. Tim Swanson, formerly the head of CannonDesign’s Chicago office, will be joining as Skender’s chief design officer, Kevin Bredeson has been named the chief technology officer, and the company is hunting for a CEO to lead its factory. The move represents a huge expansion in scope for Skender, which has also changed its name from Skender Construction as part of the new direction the company is pursuing. “We are asking new questions,” said Skender President and Partner Justin Brown in a statement. “Why can’t we apply sophisticated design principles to modular manufacturing? How can we eliminate weather delays by bringing large parts of the process indoors? How can we significantly boost productivity without sacrificing quality?” Skender is expecting to roll full apartments, hotel rooms, and pieces of both multi-family residences and healthcare buildings off its new assembly line. Everything can be fabricated at the factory by tradespeople, from cabinets to light fixtures to units that have been pre-wired and set up for plumbing, then shipped to the potential construction site and unloaded via crane. Besides being able to construct modular buildings from the ground up (similar to New York’s Carmel Place), Skender plans to use the factory to work on both the interior and exteriors of its projects simultaneously, and standardize production. To say that modular architecture has had its ups and downs in recent years would be an understatement. While the world’s largest modular hotel, the Stephen B. Jacobs Group-designed CitizenM, is nearly complete in New York, the industry is still smarting from the bruising battle it took to complete 461 Dean Street in Brooklyn. The Pacific Park tower eventually became the world's tallest modular building, but was mired in lawsuits between Skanska and developer Forest City Ratner until the latter cut their losses and sold their modular manufacturing factory to architect Roger Krulak and his company, FullStack Modular. It remains to be seen if Skender can make the model work for them, but their smaller scope should help. If all goes as planned, Skender expects to pick a site for the factory in the coming months and to begin production in the fourth quarter of this year.
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The List

Here are the 25 largest architecture firms in the New York area
Crain's has released its annual Book of Lists, which includes a listing of the largest 25 New York-area architecture firms, ranked by the number of New York-based architects. The New York area, in this case, includes New York City, Nassau, Suffolk and Westchester counties, as well Bergen, Essex, Hudson, and Union counties in New Jersey. All of the information is based on 2016 numbers, and most of the information was self-reported by firms. The project totals includes projects in the design stage, under construction, or completed in 2016. In the case of a tie, firms were listed alphabetically. Without a doubt, these are the giants that are shaping New York's built environment, and far beyond. 1. Gensler New York-area architects: 254 Worldwide architects: 1,177 U.S. projects: 6,806 International projects: 1,742 2. Perkins Eastman New York-area architects: 253 Worldwide architects: 452 U.S. projects: 650 International projects: 200 3. HOK New York-area architects: 224 Worldwide architects: 1,171 U.S. projects: 981 International projects: 814 4. Skidmore, Owings & Merill New York-area architects: 157 Worldwide architects: 374 U.S. projects: 375 International projects: 357 5. Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates New York-area architects: 127 Worldwide architects: 212 U.S. projects: 44 International projects: 164 6. Spector Group New York-area architects: 86 Worldwide architects: 88 U.S. projects: 169 International projects: 10 7. CetraRuddy Architecture New York-area architects: 84 Worldwide architects: 84 U.S. projects: 76 International projects: 3 8. FXFOWLE New York-area architects: 75 Worldwide architects: 75 U.S. projects: 136 International projects: 8 9. Ennead Architects New York-area architects: 72 Worldwide architects: 75 U.S. projects: n/d International projects: n/d 10. STV Architects Inc. New York-area architects: 71 Worldwide architects: 93 U.S. projects: 1,712 International projects: 13 11. Robert A.M. Stern Architects New York-area architects: 64 Worldwide architects: 64 U.S. projects: 186 International projects: 41 12. Gerner Kronick & Valcarcel New York-area architects: 60 Worldwide architects: n/d U.S. projects: 75 International projects: 0 13. SLCE Architects New York-area architects: 57 Worldwide architects: 58 U.S. projects: 63 International projects: 1 14. Beyer Blinder Belle Architects & Planners New York-area architects: 54 Worldwide architects: 78 U.S. projects: 261 International projects: 21 14. Dattner Architects New York-area architects: 54 Worldwide architects: 54 U.S. projects: 98 International projects: 0 14. Stephen B. Jacobs Group New York-area architects: 54 Worldwide architects: 56 U.S. projects: 30 International projects: 2 17. HLW International New York-area architects: 48 Worldwide architects: 74 U.S. projects: n/d International projects: n/d 18. CannonDesign New York-area architects: 47 Worldwide architects: 453 U.S. projects: n/d International projects: n/d 19. AECOM New York-area architects: 46 Worldwide architects: 1,491 U.S. projects: n/d International projects: n/d 20. H2M Architects & Engineers New York-area architects: 43 Worldwide architects: n/d U.S. projects: n/d International projects: n/d 21. Pei Cobb Freed & Partners Architects New York-area architects: 36 Worldwide architects: 36 U.S. projects: 24 International projects: 21 22. Francis Cauffman New York-area architects: 33 Worldwide architects: 83 U.S. projects: 176 International projects: 1 22. TPG Architecture New York-area architects: 33 Worldwide architects: 33 U.S. projects: 1,238 International projects: 11 24. EwingCole New York-area architects: 32 Worldwide architects: 150 U.S. projects: 400 International projects: 0   25. Perkins & Will New York-area architects: 30 Worldwide architects: 684 U.S. projects: 3,263 International projects: 1,088      
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Gimme Gimme!

AN Editors' gift picks
In addition to our gift guide from the December issue that featured some of our favorite architects and designer's tops picks, here are some ideas from our diverse team here at The Architect's Newspaper! Take a look below at what our editorial staff is craving, ranging from funny to fabulous.  William Menking, Editor-in-Chief Here’s one for the serious urbanist in your family. Books from Urban Research on the daily life we all face in the ‘Age of Trump.’ One Star Press creates affordable artworks for the working designer and for slightly less than $1000. Two chairs designed by Rirkrit Tiravanija and John Baldessari (both with Sébastien de Ganay) are the perfect gift for the average art collector. They are cut out of four pieces out of simple plywood on a local CNC machine to make the chair's carbon footprint as low as possible—and assemble it in a minute with no screws or glue. Matt Shaw, Senior Editor Props by Besler & Sons These stylish terrazzo objects are as durable as they are ambiguous. Each is uniquely patterned with colored glass and marble chips, and the shapes can be used for a variety of functions. The Allen Sock The Allen Sock is patterned with the crown of the Chrysler Building and is named after architect William Van Alen, who completed the skyscraper in 1930. Insulation Scarf Insulation Scarf takes the universal drawing symbol for insulation and applies it to an actual piece of human insulation: The scarf you wrap around your neck. Begin With The Past This book tracks the long process of designing and building the National Museum of African American History, including how to create consensus about a building for an entire group of underrepresented people. Zachary Edelson, Web Editor Vertical: The City from Satellites to Bunkers Newly-released, this book uses verticality as a way to explore a complex web of global inequality, cities, architecture, history, and more. It's a unique perspective on how architecture intersects with politics and culture. Dymaxion Folding Globe For fans of Buckminster Fuller, a great little desktop addition. Portable Pico Projector One of the top rated micro projectors of 2016, it's great for giving presentations anywhere (and can double for entertainment as well). Olivia Martin, Managing Editor Oto for East Japan Project Speaker This handmade ceramic smartphone holder, speaker, and dish by KiBiSi (Bjarke Ingels's side project with Lars Larsen of Kilo and Jens Martin Skibsted of Skibsted Ideation) and Kengo Kuma is not only a whole lot of starchitecture in one tiny object, but is also practical and elegant. The Japanese walnut wood naturally amplifies sound and the ceramic comes in fun colors like matcha green and sumi black. Available at design shop. Shinola Bolt Necklace I don't know if a collaboration between the super hip powerhouses of jewelry designer Pamela Love and Detriot manufacturer Shinola is genius or obnoxious, but the resulting new jewelry line is very nice. If bling isn't your thing, Shinola's partnership with GE yields some seriously sleek power strips and extension cords (be still my heart). Dustin Koda, Art Director
Encyclopedia of Flowers III, Flower Compositions by Makoto Azuma, Photography by Shunsuke Shinoki In this three-volume series, Encyclopedia of Flowers, Azuma Makoto works within the constraints of a rapidly changing flower market and the ephemeral nature of botanical life to create sculptural and spatial experiences. Through Shusuke Shiinoki's photographs, Makoto transforms the prosaic into works of transcendent expression and existentially examines our ongoing interest with beauty, context, and mortality.
Marble Bench by Muller Van Severen Belgian duo Fien Muller and Hannes Van Severen created a bench strict in form yet whimsical in color. The luxurious cuts of marble belie the bench's commodious practicality. Becca Blasdel, Products Editor Nobel Truong Fluorescent Cacti  For someone with a brown thumb, or an apartment with very little natural light, Nobel Truong's fluorescent cactus sculptures are just the ticket. Plus, they are available in lamp versions, so you can have a mini desert disco when it's too cold to leave the house. Eames Coffee Table Book
This book is a feast for the eyes for any Eames fan. With drawings, photographs, and plans–all of the dynamic duo's projects are in chronological order from their earliest furniture designs to their short film, Powers of Ten.  Antonio Pacheco, West Editor Nimbus Cork Square Side Table Here’s a very cool-looking chair made of steel and cork that is also very comfortable to sit in. The seat is milled from thick slabs of renewable cork from Portugal that have been buffed soft and shaped to have bullnose corners. Dekalog Kieślowski’s Dekalog is a film series from 1980s-Poland that chronicles the lives of the residents of a Soviet-era housing complex. Each of the ten, hour-long films draws on the Ten Commandments for thematic inspiration.

Dark Age Ahead was Jane Jacobs’s last and perhaps most dystopian book. In it, she foretells the nationalist, anti-neoliberal political wave sweeping the western world today. Jacobs explains our current situation as a necessary crisis resulting from our transition toward a technology-focused society.

Jason Sayer, Editorial Assistant

Budget Brutalism When your love for concrete is bound only by your wallet then you’ll be pleased to know of Polish firm Zupagrafika and British artist Oscar Francis. If you feel like recreating your own Brutalist block, Zupagrafika has you covered with a cardboard edition of Ernő Goldfinger’s Balfron Tower (also known as Trellick Tower). If that doesn’t take your fancy, Oscar Francis’s wash bag comes enamored with a print of Sulkin House in Hackney, north east London on it. Art Deco Wrapping paper Art Deco and geometry go hand-in-hand so the style seems ready-made to be used for pattern work, in this case, on wrapping paper. This subtle approach will most likely bring a warm smile to most design types before they’ve even opened your gift. Just make sure the gift is as good! Frank Lloyd Wright Bird Feeder Frank Lloyd wright had an affinity for the natural world, often celebrating it in his work—Falling Water being the most obvious example. "Study nature, love nature, stay close to nature. It will never fail you,” he once said. Now you can feed Frank’s feathered friends with this bird feeder whose glass artwork emulates patterns found in the architect's Darwin D. Martin house in Buffalo. Audrey Wachs, Associate Editor

Stop. Close your forest of Amazon Prime tabs right now, and make a gift to nonprofits that make our built environment more just, equitable, and beautiful. Better yet, make a donation for the architect in your life: She has enough crap already, and you get a tax deduction. Win-win, right? Here’s a few suggestions:

If you care about fairness and equity in the field, become a member of the Architecture Lobby. The national organization promotes the value of architecture in the public realm and advocates for structural change within the profession to produce better working conditions. For general donations, the group’s Architecture Initiative funds public forums and the Lobby’s educational mission. To the uninitiated, gender and architecture have more synergy than meets the eye. Organizations like QSPACE, a queer architectural research organization based at the New Museum’s NEW INC, center sexuality and gender in its analysis of the built environment. In addition to donations, the group, founded this year by GSAPP grads, also solicits technical expertise for ongoing projects. QSPACE isn’t the only group accepting in-kind donations. In the wake of the Oakland warehouse fire that killed 36 people, architects Melissa J. Frost and Susan Surface founded national nonprofit Safer Spaces to help artist-run venues and live/work lofts get up to code. Right now, the group is soliciting donations of fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, and other fire prevention tools, as well building services, project assistance, and plain old-fashioned cash. Check out their local meet-ups and skill-share document here. For the architect-urbanist, a great way to give back to your city is a gift to your nearest Community Development Corporation (CDC). These nonprofit, hyperlocal organizations typically operate in disinvested, low-income neighborhoods to develop affordable housing, spur economic development, plan neighborhoods, and make streets beautiful. There are CDCs in nearly every city, and for New Yorkers, this list from NYU’s Furman Center is a good place to start.
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The Knick(erbocker)

See the top-to-bottom restoration of this nineteenth century Soho loft building
Post–World War II deindustrialization may have cleared out Soho's manufacturing tenants, but despite a thoroughly-documented influx of artists, many buildings still fell into disrepair. This past summer, a trio of New York firms took on the monumental task of top-to-bottom renovating one structure on a prime corner top-to-bottom. The seven-story, Renaissance Revival–style Knickerbocker Telephone Co., designed and built in 1894 by architect John T. Williams, is within the bounds of the SoHo Cast Iron Historic District Extension, a surviving slice of a once-bustling commercial district that hosted textile producers and dry goods warehouses. On the outside, New York–based Scott Henson Architect recast the cast-iron decorative elements on the facade, installed historically accurate wood window frames, and added new steps to the entryway, while also New York–based Stephen B. Jacobs Group Architects recreated the storefront bays in their original arrangement. Deterioration prompted the architects to streamline the ornate structure slightly: To match the rusticated facade, brownstone sills and lintels were cut back and replaced. The top floor of the north side of the Lafayette Street facade was completely reconstructed with an arched brick, original window replica. The architects collaborated with preservation consultants Higgins Quasebarth & Partners on the detailing, and the firm's paint analysis prompted the designers to coat the windows, cast iron detailing, and sheet metal cornice in a historically accurate dark yellow color. While preservation law dictates that the exterior be done in a historic style, the design team, led by Stephen B. Jacobs Group, gave the 105,000-square-foot interior a contemporary upgrade. Clothing retailer J.C. Penney shares "loft-like" space with Pirch, the appliance distributor. Cast-iron columns and timber beams frame "loft-like" spaces with glassed-in offices with polished concrete floors, while a first-floor skylight floods the ground-floor appliance showroom with light. Eight Inc. collaborated on the interior design.
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Surf Vets Place

Giant affordable housing development planned for Coney Island Boardwalk
Georgica Green Ventures and Concern for Independent Living are bringing affordable housing to the Coney Island Boardwalk. New York–based Stephen B. Jacobs Group is the architect for the project. Phase One of Surf Vets Place will add 135 units and 7,000 square feet of commercial space to a 170,000-square-foot parcel at the corner of West 21st Street and Surf Avenue. Residents will be steps away from the beach, and walking distance from the Brooklyn Cyclones stadium and Luna Park. Plans filed in April indicate that 52 of the apartments will be available to households earning 60 percent of the area median income, which in 2015 was $86,300 for a family of four, while 82 apartments will be reserved for homeless veterans. The developers will build a new street, Ocean Way, to connect West 20th and West 21st streets at midblock, and all of the buildings in the development will face onto shared courtyards. The listings page highlights standard amenities, including a fitness center, rooftop terrace, laundry room, and bike storage. Financing documents suggest that the development is projected to cost $68.8 million; construction on the first phase is expected to be complete by 2018. Land around the former amusement park was rezoned for commercial and residential development in 2009. Renderings suggest that buildings up to 25 stories tall will be added at later stages of Surf Vets Place, but when The Architect's Newspaper reached out to CityRealty for comment, no employees were available to speak about the project.
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The Architectural League New York announces 2016 Emerging Voices winners
The Architectural League of New York announced the eight winners of its annual Emerging Voices program. “The 2016 ‘Voices,’ each responding to distinct geographic sites and typologies, all compellingly address the relationship between architecture and place by resourcefully synthesizing programmatic invention with computational production and the craft of building,” Anne Rieselbach, program director, said in a statement. This year, the jury panel was composed of Sunil Bald, Henry N. Cobb, Susannah Drake, Mario Gooden, Karrie Jacobs, Anna Kats, Thomas Phifer, and Billie Tsien. Lectures with the winners will be held throughout March and April at The Archbishop Fulton J. Sheen Center for Thought and Culture, 18 Bleecker Street, New York, NY at 7:00 p.m. Please verify all program information with The Architectural League before listing. The 2016 winners are... Alex Anmahian and Nick Winton, principals and cofounders of Anmahian Winton Architects A Cambridge, Massachusetts, architecture firm with works as far away as Turkey and close to home in Boston that views “the synthesis of place, program, and community as an opportunity to enhance the rituals of everyday life, foster a sense of wellbeing, and to inspire the imagination.” Omar Gandhi, principal at Omar Gandhi Architect Based in Halifax and Toronto, Gandhi’s projects are site-specific and material forward, keeping to a “modest, formal lineage that makes for architecture that is accessible to all types of people.” Cesar Guerrero, Ana Cecilia Garza, Carlos Flores, and Maria Sevilla of S-AR The Monterrey, Mexico–based firm focuses on “the design and development of architectural projects of several scales and typologies from private, experimental, and social structures to architectural installations, educational buildings as well as furniture and book design.” Frank Jacobus and Marc Manack, principals at SILO AR+D Splitting their time between Cleveland and Fayetteville, Arkansas, Jacobus and Manack have worked on a spectrum of projects from a church in Cleveland, a “Super Sukkah” pavilion in St. Louis, and a home in Fayetteville. Jon Lott, principal at PARA Project and cofounding member of Collective-LOK New York’s Jon Lott has most recently crafted a series of sleek, monolithic structures in Syracuse, New York, including the Haffenden House residence, the Crawford Attic Writing Room, and La Casita. E.B. Min and Jeffrey L. Day, principals, Min | Day Founded on the belief that “architecture is a spatial and material practice in the service of human habitation,” the studio is located in San Francisco and Omaha, with projects ranging from a home to a public transportation station. Rozana Montiel founder, Rozana Montiel | Estudio de Arquitectura Montiel’s work focuses on the public domain with projects that include the City Out of Line Park in Mexico City, Common-Unity, a public space rehabilitation project in Mexico City, and Court, a sports field in Veracruz, Mexico. Heather Roberge principal, Murmur Roberge’s most recent projects include an installation at SCI-Arc Gallery and two residences in Los Angeles, where the architect is based.
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Deborah Berke Designing 700 Residences in Lower Manhattan Art-Deco Skyscraper
Move over Woolworth Building. Another iconic Lower Manhattan skyscraper is slated for a residential conversion, this time by Deborah Berke Partners and architects of record Steven B. Jacobs Group. The 66-story art deco landmark at 70 Pine Street was built in 1932 as the Cities Service Company, and more recently served as the headquarters of American International Group (AIG), and now developer Rose Associates plans to transform the tower into 700 luxury apartments above a 300-room hotel. Standing at 952 feet tall, 70 Pine was originally the 3rd tallest building in the world, behind the Empire State Building and the Chrysler Building, and is still one of the tallest in the city. Stylized art deco detailing in stone and aluminum covers the building's exterior and lobby, with a miniature stone model of the structure standing between the building's main entrances (see below). Stephen B. Jacobs, principal of the Stephen B. Jacobs Group, said all significant historical elements of the structure will remain intact in line with NYC Landmarks laws and guidelines for historic tax credits. Individual residences, however, will begin with a clean slate and feature modern design. "The residences will be modern in a way that's inspired by what's already there," said Christopher Yost, Associate Architect at Deborah Berke Partners. "They're designed to be compatible with the existing building." Interior demolition has already begun on site, but Jacobs noted that final plans including the official number of units could change in the future and that a design team for the hotel below the residences has not been finalized. He said four to six apartments are planned per floor  in the tower with more units filling floors on the tower's base. The building's pointed spire, featuring an observation deck and glowing lantern at its pinnacle, will be part of the residential program, but it hasn't been decided whether it will serve as a penthouse or communal space. Construction is expected to take around 18 months, meaning 70 Pine should open sometime in summer 2014.
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The Inner Circle
Milstein Hall, Cornell University by OMA.
Philippe Ruault

AN’s annual resource list may be published every year but it is never the same. Painstakingly drawn from extensive interviews by our editors with the architects and builders of the best architecture of 2011, these names are the too-often unacknowledged cornerstones that guarantee the quality and excellence of today’s architecture. We both herald and share them with you.

General Contractor / Project Manager

 

Arroyo Contracting Corp.
12 Desbrosses St.,
New York;
516-639-7618

Balfour Beatty/Barnhill
2311 North Main St.,
Tarboro, NC;
252-823-1021

Barr & Barr
460 West 34th St.,
New York;
212-563-2330

Bernsohn & Fetner
625 West 51st St.,
New York;
212-315-4330

F.J. Sciame Construction Co.
14 Wall St.,
New York;
212-232-2200

Graciano
18-73 43rd St.,
Astoria, NY;
718-932-7867

Jacobs
2 Penn Plaza, Ste. 0603,
New York;
212-944-2000

Keating Building Corporation
1600 Arch St.,
Philadelphia;
610-668-4100

Kreisler Borg Florman
97 Montgomery St.,
Scarsdale, NJ;
914-725-4600

L.F. Driscoll
9 Presidential Blvd.,
Bala Cynwyd, PA;
610-668-0950

 

Lavada
499 Van Brunt St.,
New York;
347-948-8894

Lettire Construction Corporation
336 East 110th St.,
New York;
212-996-6640

MG & Co
230 West 17th St.,
New York;
212-691-4001

Mascaro Construction Company
1720 Metropolitan St.,
Pittsburgh, PA;
412-321-4901

MJE Contracting
109-10 34th Ave.,
Corona, NY;
708-507-8661

Noble Construction
675 Garfield Ave.,
Jersey City, NJ;
201-721-6581

Plaza Construction
877-767-5292

Procida Realty & Construction
456 East 173rd St.,
Bronx, NY;
718-299-7000

RC Dolner Construction
15-17 East 16th St.,
New York;
212-645-2190

Saunders Construction
6950 South Jordan Rd.,
Centennial, CO;
303-699-9000

 

Schimenti
650 Danbury Rd.,
Ridgefield, CT;
914-244-9100

SoHo Restoration
104 Calyer St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-389-3550

Structure Tone
770 Broadway,
New York;
212-481-6100

Tishman Construction
666 5th Ave.,
New York;
212-399-3600

United American Builders
205 Arch St.,
Philadelphia;
215-551-5534

VCD Construction
35 Carroll St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-643-3775

Welliver
250 North Genesee St.,
Montour Falls, NY;
607-535-5400

Yorke Construction Corp.
140 West 31st St.,
New York;
212-564-8467

 
Penn Medicine / L.F. Driscoll / Rafael Viñoly (left); Film Society / Yorke Construction / Rockwell Group (right).
Brad Feinkopf (left) AND Albert Vecerka/Esto (right)
 

Arroyo Contracting did a good job on the Sunshine Bronx Business Incubator. It was a complicated project with many angled walls and corners. They looked into new ways of working, moving from their background in traditional design to contemporary design.”

Harel Edery
Mosza
 

Graciano has experienced masons that know how to work with terracotta and its reinstallation, using pieces that were reconditioned and some that were brand new.”

Joe Coppola
Dattner Architects
 
 

“We were fortunate to have RC Dolner build the Atrium. They had just finished the Greek and Roman galleries at the Met; we were confident they could make elegant and refined traditional detailing. At the Atrium they were able to apply their same high standards in a modern setting.”

Tod Williams
Tod Williams + Billie Tsien Architects
 

Yorke’s level of service was outstanding. The site superintendent in particular was exemplary and always in contact with us about how the construction was affecting the design. That attitude then filtered down to the contractor and subcontractors.”

Michael Fischer
Rockwell Group

https://cdn.archpaper.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/04/2012_best_of_11.jpgCentra at Metropark / DeSimone / KPF.
Michael Moran
 

Engineers

 

Civil/Environmental


Langan Engineering and Environmental Services
360 West 31st St.,
New York;
212-479-5400

Leonard J. Strandberg and Associates
One Edgewater Plz.,
Staten Island;
718-420-9693

Pennoni Associates
3001 Market St.,
Philadelphia;
215-222-3000

Geotechnical


Geodesign
224 West 35th St.,
New York;
212-221-6651

Mueser Rutledge Consulting Engineers
225 West 34th St.,
New York;
917-339-9300

P.W. Grosser Consulting
630 Johnson Ave.,
Bohemia, NY;
631-589-6353

Pillori Associates
71 Route 35,
Laurence Harbor, NJ;
732-335-0059

MEP


AKF
1501 Broadway,
New York;
212-354-5656

AltieriSeborWieber
31 Knight St.,
Norwalk, CT;
230-866-5538

AMA Consulting Engineers
250 West 39th St.,
New York;
212-944-7722

Ambrosino, DePinto & Schmieder
275 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-645-6060

Ballinger
833 Chestnut St.,
Philadelphia;
215-446-0900

Ettinger Engineering ASSOCIATES
505 8th Ave.,
New York;
212-244-2410

 

Fiskaa Engineering
589 8th Ave.,
New York;
212-736-9600

ICOR Associates
256 West 38th St.,
New York;
212-994-9593

Jaros Baum & Bolles
80 Pine St.,
New York;
212-530-9300

Joseph R. Loring and Associates
360 West 31st St.,
New York;
212-563-7400

P.A. Collins
15 West 26th St.,
New York;
212-696-5294

Rubiano Associates
64 Fulton St.,
New York;
212-732-7842

Multidisciplinary


Arup
155 6th AVE.,
New York;
212-229-2669

Birdsall Services Group
2100 Highway 35,
Sea Girt, NJ;
732-681-1165

Buro Happold
100 Broadway,
New York;
212-334-2025

DeSimone
18 West 18th St.,
New York;
212-532-2211

HDR
500 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-542-6000

ME Engineers
29 West 38th St.,
New York;
212-447-6770

Rosini Engineering
142 West 36th St.,
New York;
212-904-0422

Thornton Tomasetti
51 Madison Ave.,
New York;
917-661-7800

Watts Engineering
95 Perry St.,
Buffalo, NY;
716-206-5100

 

Weidlinger Associates
375 Hudson St.,
New York;
212-367-3000

WSP Flack + Kurtz
512 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-532-9600

Structural


Eipel Barbieri Marschhausen
224 West 35th St.,
New York;
212-695-5120

Gilsanz Murray Steficek
129 West 27th St.,
New York;
212-254-0030

Hage Engineering
560 Broadway,
New York;
212-358-7778

KPFF
180 Varick St.,
New York;
212-973-3748

Macintosh Engineering
21133 Sterling Ave.,
Georgetown, DE;
302-448-2000

Mulhern Kulp
20 South Maple St.,
Ambler, PA;
215-646-8001

Murray Engineering
307 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-741-1102

Office of Structural Design
9 Revere Rd.,
Belle Mead, NJ;
908-359-8977

Robert Silman Associates
88 University Pl.,
New York;
212-620-7970

Severud Associates
469 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-986-3700

WSP Cantor Seinuk
228 East 45th St.,
New York;
212-687-9888


Milstein Hall, Cornell University / Robert Silman Associates / OMA.
Philippe Ruault
 

“John Riner of PW Grosser is one of the handful of consultants in this area who has substantial experience with open loop wells.”

Michael Tucker
Beyer Blinder BellE

 

“We have worked on several historic buildings in New York, but when they are as high profile or popular as the Puck Building, you need a consultant who understands these types of spaces. EBM Structural Engineers is one of the preeminent firms in New York with vast experience in adaptive reuse in a historic context. We worked with Ken Eipel and Rich Grabowski on the REI Soho project and their expertise as historians on New York architecture made them valuable partners for Callison.”

David Curtis
Callison
 

Joseph R. Loring and Associates anticipated issues at NYU SCPS and worked creatively with the design team to insert contemporary mechanical systems into an existing building with a complex new program.”

Carol Loewenson
Mitchell/Giurgola Architects

 

Cantor Seinuk developed a core outrigger wall design that eliminated a lot of sheer walls, which helped a lot with the very complicated unit layouts at 8 Spruce. We just find them to be the best when it comes to structural engineers.”

Joe Recchichi
Forest City Ratner Companies
 

“Edward Messina at Severud Associates is known as ‘Fast Eddie’ around our business because you call him up and he’s right over.”

Henry Smith-Miller
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects

 

DeSimone designed the tree column and the big spans for Centra. It was a big effort to make that happen. They’re a really great engineering firm, and one thing that they’re great at is keeping the design team and client comfortable with very complicated things and also working with the construction team, while keeping everything on schedule.”

Lloyd Sigal and Hugh Trumbull
KPF
 

“The North Carolina Museum of Art is really all about daylight, and Arup did an extraordinary job calculating the amount of natural and artificial light and how it combined throughout the space.”

Thomas Phifer
Thomas Phifer and Partners

 

“At Clyfford Still, everything you see is structure. So KPFF's role was very key, especially in translating the structural design so it would be read in the perforated ceilings where the tolerances were very tricky, combined with reinforcing with rebar to maintain a crack-free finish.”

Chris Bixby
Allied Works Architecture

Facade & curtain wall

 

Consultants


Dewhurst Macfarlane and Partners
45 East 20th St.,
New York;
212-375-1600

Front
186 Varick St.,
New York;
212-242-2220

Gordon H. Smith Corporation
200 Madison Ave.,
New York;
212-696-0600

Heitmann & Associates
14500 South Outer Forty Rd.,
Chesterfield, MO;
314-439-1944

R.A. Heintges & Associates
126 5th Ave.,
New York;
212-652-2963

Simpson Gumpertz & Heger
19 West 34th St.,
New York;
212-271-7000

 

Manufacturers/ Installers


Airflex
937 Conklin St.,
Farmingdale, NY;
631-752-1309

APG International
70 Sewell St.,
Glassboro, NJ;
856-863-8034

Architectural Metal Fabricators
314 48th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-765-0722

ASI Limited
4485 South Perry Worth Rd.,
Whitestown, IN;
317-769-7170

Cladding Corp.
215 South Hwy. 101,
Solana Beach, CA;
888-826-8453

EFCO
1000 County Rd.,
Monett, MO;
417-235-3193

GKD Metal Fabrics
825 Chesapeake Dr.,
Cambridge, MD;
410-221-0542

greenscreen
1743 South La Cienega Blvd.,
Los Angeles;
310-837-0526

 

Island International Exterior Fabricators
101 Scott Ave.,
Calverton, NY;
631-208-3500

Jakob/MMA Architectural Systems
Westfield Industrial Estate,
Midsomer Norton,
Somerset, United Kingdom;
+44-0845-1300-135

Jordan Panel Systems
196 Laurel Rd.,
East Northport, NY;
631-754-4900

Kwaneer
500 East 12th St.,
Bloomsburg, PA;
570-784-8000

Permasteelisa
123 Day Hill Rd.,
Windsor, CT;
860-298-2000

Schüco
240 Pane Rd.,
Newington, CT;
877-472-4826

W&W Glass
300 Airport Executive Park,
Nanuet, NY;
845-425-4000

 
Buffalo Courthouse / Dewhurst Macfarlane / KPF (left); Via Verde / FRONT / Grimshaw/Dattner Architects (right).
david seide (left) AND Robert Garneau (right)
 

Gordon Smith is a tried and true Manhattan curtain wall consultant. He kept us out of trouble and found good value for the wall at Centra. We could barely afford a curtain wall for this building and he helped us sneak it in and detail it really well so we can sleep at night.”

Lloyd Sigal and Hugh Trumbull
KPF
 

“There’s a learning curve on installing a European curtain wall system. Architectural Metal Fabricators took a real interest in jumping in and getting a technical understanding of the system.”

Henry Smith-Miller
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects

 

Front was the key to unlocking the prefab facade at Via Verde. It cost a bit more, but it was faster to put together on site. They helped us translate that.”

Robert Garneau
Grimshaw Architects
 

“They protected me! At 8 Spruce, the extremely unique wall was largely aesthetically driven but it's just as advanced in performance and Heitmann took care of everything behind the wall in terms of feasibility, budget and schedule.”

Joe Recchichi
Forest City Ratner Companies

 

Island Fabrications knows how to bring all the components together; they ordered material globally and fabricated them locally.”

Bill Stein
Dattner Architects

Fittings & Furniture

 

Carpet & Textile


Bentley Prince Street
91 5th Ave.,
New York;
212-463-0606

Dune
156 Wooster St.,
New York;
212-925-6171

Gallery Seventeen Interiors
PO Box 549,
Nanuet, NY;
888-827-1182

Interface
404 Park Ave. South,
New York;
212-994-9994

Maharem
251 Park Ave. South,
New York;
212-319-4789

Re:Source of New Jersey
66 Ford Rd.,
Denville, NJ;
973-625-0715

Rose Brand East
4 Emerson Ln.,
Secaucus, NJ;
201-809-1730

Custom Fixtures & Signage


Artitalia Group
11755 Rodolphe Forget,
Montreal, QC,
Canada;
514-643-0114

Fleetwood
225 Peach St.,
Leesport, PA;
484-248-5271

REEVE Store Equipment
9131 Bermudez St.,
Pico Rivera, CA;
562-949-2535

Doors & Frames


Dynamic Architectural Windows & Doors
30440 Progressive Way,
Abbotsford, BC,
Canada;
800-661-8111

Goldbrecht USA
1512 11th St.,
Santa Monica, CA;
310-393-5540

 

PK-30 System
3607 Atwood Rd.,
Stone Ridge, NY;
212-473-8050

Furniture


Figueras International Seating

Fproduct
250 Saint Marks Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
917-202-2349

Greystone Seating
7900 Logistic Dr.,
Zeeland, MI;
616-931-1114

Haworth
125 Park Ave.,
New York;
212-977-5350

Irwin Telescopic Seating Company
610 East Cumberland Rd.,
Altamont, IL;
618-483-6157

Martela
384 Forest Ave.,
Laguna Beach, CA;
866-627-8352

Moroso
146 Greene St.,
New York;
212-334-7222

Resource Furniture
969 Third Ave., New York;
212-753-2039

Series Seating
20900 NE 30th Ave.,
Miami, FL;
305-932-4626

Tomas Osinski Design
4240 Glenmuir Ave.,
Los Angeles;
323-226-0576

Hardware


Assa Abloy
110 Sargent Dr.,
New Haven, CT;
800-377-3948

Häfele
25 East 26th St.,
New York;
800-423-3531

 

Kitchen & Bath


AF Supply
22 West 21st St.,
New York;
212-243-5400

Axor Hansgrohe
29 9th Ave.,
New York;
212-463-5790

Davis and Warshow
57-22 49th St.,
Maspeth, NY;
888-900-1392

Dornbracht
1700 Executive Dr. South,
Duluth, MN;
770-564-3599

Drimmers
1608 Coney Island Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
877-338-3500

Purekitchen
66 North 11th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-715-0843

SieMatic New York
150 East 58th St.,
New York;
212-752-7900

Valcucine
66 Crosby St.,
New York;
212-253-5969

Zucchetti Rubinetteria
Via Molini di Resiga, 29,
Gozzano, Italy;
+39-0322-954700

Laboratory Casework


Thermo Fisher Scientific
1316 18th St.,
Two Rivers, WI;
920-793-1121

Vintage Furniture


RePop
68 Washington Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-260-8032

 
Louise Nevelson Plaza / John Lewis Glass / Smith-miller + Hawkinson Architects (left); 8 Spruce / Gehry Partners (right).
Michael Moran (left) AND Courtesy Forest City Ratner (right)
 

Glass

 

3form
520 8th Ave.,
New York;
212-627-0883

A-Val Architectural Metal Corp.
240 Washington St.,
Mount Vernon, NY;
914-662-0300

CBO Glass
13595 Broadway,
Alden, NY;
716-824-5000

Colory Metal & Glass
2522 State Rd.,
Bensalem, PA

EFCO
1000 County Rd.,
Monett, MO;
417-235-3193

Galaxy Glass & Stone
277 Fairfield Rd.,
Fairfield, NJ;
973-575-5235

J.E. Berkowitz
856-456-7800

John Lewis Glass
10229 Pearmain St.,
Oakland, CA;
510-635-4607

 

Lhotsky
Pelechov 17,
elezný Brod,
Czech Republic;
+420-483-389-334

Moduline Window Systems
930 Single Ave.,
Wausau, WI;
800-869-4567

National Glass & Metal Company
1424 Easton Rd.,
Horsham, PA;
215-938-8880

Oldcastle Glass
1350 6th Ave.,
New York;
212-957-5400

PPG Industries
One PPG Pl.,
Pittsburgh, PA;
412-434-3131

Prelco
94 Blvd. Cartier,
Rivière-du-Loup Québec;
418-862-2274

 

Skyline Sky-Lites
2925 Delta Dr.,
Colorado Springs, CO;
866-625-1330

Viracon
800 Park Dr.,
Owatonna, MN;
800-922-5374

Vitrocsa USA
5741 Buckingham Pkwy.,
Culver City, CA;
300-988-4455

Walch Windows
Zementwerkstraße 42,
Ludesch, Austria;
+43-0-5550-20290-0

Windsorsky
78 Joes Hill Rd.,
Brewster, NY
888-397-3330

Zecca Mirror & Glass
1829 Boone Ave.,
Bronx, NY;
718-589-3222

“Interior glass subcontractor A-Val worked creatively to ensure design intent in extremely complex conditions including the three-story open elliptical stair at the NYU SCPS.”

Carol Loewenson
Mitchell/Giurgola Architects
 

“You can get good window R-value in the United States but you can’t get the quality of high solar heat gain as you can with Walch. The combination is unmatched.”

Sam Bargetz
Loadingdock 5
 

CBO out of Buffalo did the glass veil and other curtain wall systems for the Buffalo Courthouse. The most difficult part was printing the Constitution on the glass with ceramic fritting. It took a lot of editing and laying it out and a very long time on our side and theirs.”

Bill Pedersen
KPF
 

John Lewis Glass would work closely with Tony Dominski at West Edge Metal. Even though it was a custom bench, it was even more custom because of the collaboration of the two firms.”

Scot Teti
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects

Sustainability

 

Airside Solutions


Aircuity
39 Chapel St.,
Newton, MA;
866-602-0700

Brownfield Consultant


D.I.R.T.
473 West Broadway,
New York;
917-972-3478

Consultants


7group
183 West Main St.,
Kutztown, PA;
610-683-0890

Association for Energy Affordability
505 Eighth Ave.,
New York;
212-279-3902

Atelier Ten
45 East 20th St.,
New York;
212-254-4500

Bright Power
11 Hanover Sq.,
New York;
212-803-5868

 

BVM Engineering
834 Inman Village Pkwy.,
Atlanta, GA;
404-806-2018

Crescent Consulting
80 Broad St.,
New York;
646-419-4900

Natural Logic
1250 Addison St.,
Berkeley, CA;
510-248-4940

Steven Winter Associates
307 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-564-5800

TRC Environmental Corp.
1430 Broadway,
New York;
212-221-7822

Veridian
21 West 38th St.,
New York;
212-704-9920

 

Green Roofs


Emery Knoll Farms
3410 Ady Rd.,
Street, MD;
410-452-5880

ZinCo Green Roofs
Grabenstraße 33,
Unterensingen, Germany;
+49-7022-6003-540

Solar


Namasté Solar
4571 Broadway St.,
Boulder, CO;
303-447-0300

Sunpower
800-786-7693

SOLAR SHADING


Mechoshade Systems, Inc.
42-03 35th St.,
Long Island City, NY;
212-254-4500


David Rubenstein Atrium / steven winter associates / Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects.
NIC LEHOUX
 

Aircuity did the recovery wheels and air handlers at Penn Medicine. Their system helped the owner meet their energy goals. It monitors the occupancy and the amount of CO2 in a space and optimizes the number of air changes so you wind up saving energy and money.”

Jim Herr
Rafael Viñoly Architects
 

Crescent was good in assisting the contractor in LEED complience during construction and helped focus the team on elements that really mattered.”

Michael Tucker
Beyer Blinder Bell

 

Bright Power did a great job of administering and coordinating the LEED application and they were responsible for designing the photovotaic system which was an important part of the building's design.”

Bill Stein
Dattner Architects
 

“We used Veridian as the sustainability consultant on Centra. Originally, we were just aiming for LEED certification. Now the numbers are coming in and they're very good. It looks like we're going to get Platinum.”

Lloyd Sigal and Hugh Trumbull
KPF

“Julie Bargmann of D.I.R.T.’s knowledge of brown fields, Navy Yards, and their detritus, was a really nice fit.”

Matt Berman
workshop/apd

Metal

 

AccuFab
232 Cherry St.,
Ithaca, NY;
607-273-3706

Alcoa
50 Industrial Blvd.,
Eastman, GA;
478-374-4746

Armstrong World Industries
2500 Columbia Ave.,
Lancaster, PA
888-207-2321

Belzona New York
79 Hazel St.,
Glen Cove, NY;
516-656-0220

Canatal Industries
2885, Boul. Frontenac Est.,
Thetford Mines, Quebec, Canada;
418-338-6044

CCR Sheet Metal
513 Porter Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-387-2473

Doralco
5919 West 118th St.,
Alsip, IL;
708-388-9324

Eliou
19 Frost St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-387-4716

Ferra Design
63 Flushing Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-852-8629

 

Firestone
1001 Lund Blvd.,
Anoka, MN;
800-426-7737

GageMetal
803 South Black River St.,
Sparta, WI;
800-786-4243

KC Fabrications
39 Steves Ln.,
Gardiner, NY;
845-255-0097

Lamcel
80 Montana Dr.,
Plattsburgh, NY;
514-457-4760

Lecapife Corp.
283 Liberty Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-342-3305

Maloya Laser
65A Mall Dr.,
Commack, NY;
631-543-2327

Metalman
110 Troutman St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-456-8759

Millenium Steel
344 West 38th St.,
New York;
212-268-1755

Nelson Industrial
1155 Squires Beach Rd.,
Pickering, ON, Canada;
905-428-2240

 

Paul C. Steck
25 Brown Ave.,
Springfield NJ;
973-376-1830

Precision Shape Solutions
243 East Blackwell St.,
Dover, NJ;
973-989-7199

Robinson Iron
1856 Robinson Rd.,
Alexandra City, AL;
800-824-2157

Veyko Design
216 Fairmount Ave.,
Philadelphia;
215-928-1349

West Edge Metal
25064 Viking St.,
Hayward, CA;
510-782-2050

 
NItehawk cinema / Maloya Laser / Caliper Studio (left); Brooklyn Navy Yard / Ferra Design / workshop/APD and Beyer Blinder Belle (right).
Ty Cole / OTTO (left) AND Robert Garneau (right)
 

Armstrong worked closely with us in providing customized, perforated metal ceiling panels that met the design intent of the Frick Chemistry Laboratory. Additionally, they did a excellent job field coordinating the installation of those panels with adjacent elements.”

Chris Stansfield
Payette Architects

“The project involved finishing hundreds of custom fabricated steel elements—KC Fabrications was extremely flexible with the schedule and was able to turn around material on short notice. They are always willing to do what is necessary to achieve the highest quality finish work.”

Charles Wolf
Dean/Wolf Architects
 

“For custom metal work that requires demanding precision and meticulous crafting, Metalman is an invaluable resource. If you can't find the right piece of hardware from a manufacturer, he will design and fabricate a custom piece to fit the requirement.”

Charles Wolf
Dean/Wolf Architects

 

“Mani from Millenium Steel is very accurate, and very budget-oriented. We worked with him before. He was able to make big steel pivot pieces.”

Jeremy Edmiston
SYSTEMarchitects
 

“We sent our drawings of pleated metal panels to a few people and got the impression that something custom would be too expensive. But a rep introduced us to Gage, who worked with our contractors to make our designs for the panels in a cost competitive way.”

Michael Fischer
Rockwell Group


Americano / Propylaea Millwork / ten arquitectos.
courtesy ten arquitectos
 

Wood

 

Custom Fabrication/ Carpentry


B & V Contracting Enterprises
590 Tuckahoe Rd.,
Yonkers, NY;
914-337-1086

Bauerschmidt & Sons
119-120 Merrick Blvd.,
Jamaica, NY

Benchcraft Concepts
A-427, Ghitorni, MG Rd.,
New Delhi, India;
+91-989-903-8395

DKDI
1021 Meyerside Rd.,
Mississaugua, ON, Canada;
416-732-8819

George Nakashima Woodworker
1847 Aquetong Rd.,
New Hope, PA;
215-862-2272

 

Ivory Build
67 35th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-369-2482

JB Millworks
383 Bandy Ln.,
Ringgold, GA;
706-965-6940

Minzner & Co.
2100 Liberty St.,
Easton, PA;
610-258-5449

Monarch Industries
99 Main St.,
Warren, RI;
401-247-5200

Propylaea Millwork
795 East 135th St.,
Bronx, NY;
718-401-9393

Seetin Design
57 Grand St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-486-5610

ShoreTech Manufacturing
757-999-5592

 

Tom Kozlowski
347-403-3859

Suppliers


Armstrong World Industries
2500 Columbia Ave.,
Lancaster, PA
888-207-2321

J.Padin
243 Parkhurst St.,
Newark, NJ;
973-642-0550

Siberian Floors
145 Hudson St.,
New York;
212-343-1510

Terra Mai
205 North Mt. Shasta Blvd.,
Shasta, CA;
530-925-1937


aA Shelter / ShoreTech Manufacturing/Tom Kozlowski / SYSTEMarchitects.
systemarchitects/tony jin
 

“The careful execution of the FSC certified teak screens and planters at Carnegie Hill House resulted from the close collaboration between our design team and Ivory Build. Their skill and rigorous approach to craft enabled us to unify this sequence of outdoor spaces through the meticulous stacking and subtle articulation of teak slats.”

Thomas Woltz
Nelson, Byrd and Woltz
 

Bob Seetin is irrepressible and has a 'bring it on' attitude. He created the metal tables, wine racks, and counters we needed for the Film Society cafe quickly and even joyfully, turning everything around within a few weeks.”

Michael Fischer
Rockwell Group
 

Tom Kozlowski is an exceptional carpenter. He was able to think around unpredicted problems. He comes up with very straightforward and quick solutions. It no longer looks like construction work, it starts to resemble millwork.”

Jeremy Edmiston
SYSTEMarchitects
 

“A pivotal design goal for REI Soho was the adaptive reuse of the materials from the existing historic Puck Building and its subsequent transformation into a retail space. Callison’s vision from the outset was to bring the space back to its original context, from the wood cladding that was repurposed from the interior brick piers to the timber from the ceiling above the ground floor that was remilled and reused for the monumental staircase treads. Terra Mai was a collaborative partner through the entire reuse process providing expert guidance and advice.”

David Curtis
Callison

Lighting

 

Designers


Amber Lite Electric Corporation
443 Wild Ave.,
Staten Island, NY;
718-761-4323

Auerbach Pollock Friedlander
266 West 37th St.,
New York;
212-764-5630

Claude R. Engle, Lighting Consultant
2 Wisconsin Cir.,
Chevy Chase, MD;
301-654-5502

Clinard Design Studio
228 Park Ave.,
New York;
646-580-5344

Davis Mackiernan Lighting
180 Varick St.,
New York;
212-431-8675

Fisher Marantz Stone
22 West 19th St.,
New York;
212-691-3020

George Sexton Associates
242 West 30th St.,
New York;
212-736-4842

Grenald Waldron
260 Haverford Ave.,
Narberth, PA;
610-667-6330

 

Kugler Ning
48 West 38th St.,
New York;
212-382-2100

L'Observatoire International
414 West 14th St.,
New York;
212-255-4463

Leni Schwendinger Light Projects
336 West 37th St.,
New York;
212-947-6282

Lumen Arch
214 West 29th St.,
New York;
212-564-6469

Peridot Lighting
419 Lafayette St.,
New York;
212-360-2339

Tillett Lighting Design
172 North 11th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-218-6578

Tillotson Design Associates
40 Worth St.,
New York;
212-675-7760

Fixtures


Amerlux
23 Daniel Rd. East,
Fairfield, NJ;
973-882-5010

Artemide
46 Greene St.,
New York;
212-925-1588

 

BEGA
1000 BEGA Way,
Carpinteria, CA;
805-684-0599

Flos
152 Greene St.,
New York;
212-941-4760

Holly Solar
1340-D Industrial Ave.,
Petaluma, CA;
707-763-6173

Lighting By Gregory
158 Bowery, New York;
212-226-4156

Lithonia Lighting
Conyers, GA;
770-922-9000

Lutron
7200 Suter Rd.,
Coopersburg, PA;
888-588-7661

Rambusch
160 Cornelison Ave.,
Jersey City, NJ;
201-333-2525

Selux
5 Lumen Ln.,
Highland, NY;
845-691-7723

Sistemalux
5455 de Gaspé,
Montréal, Quebec, Canada;
514-523-1339

Zumtobel Lighting
44 West 18th St., New York;
212-243-0460

   
North Carolina Museum of Art / Fisher Marantz stone / Thomas Phifer and Partners/Pierce Brinkley Cease + Lee (left); Buffalo Courthouse / Tillotson / KPF (center); Sunshine Incubator / Lighting by Gregory / Studio Mosza (right).
Iwan Baan (left); david seide (center); AND Ori Dubow (right)
 

Paul Marantz's lighting design is one of the most mesmerizing aspects of the 9/11 Memorial and plaza.”

Matthew Donham
PWP Landscape Architecture

 

“A company in California called Holly Solar fabricated the LED lights in the facade of the Nitehawk Cinema. It’s a small little company, but they do custom light fixtures. They’re good.”

Stephen Lynch
Caliper Studio
 

Kugler Ning is on board with understanding the world architects work in—working with tectonics—to create the right effect. Sometimes lighting designers can be more interested in the fixtures than the final effect. Kugler Ning helped to make the lighting fixtures disappear.”

Scot Teti
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects
 

“We worked with Lumen Arch on the lighting design of Penn Medicine. They just did a fabulous job. We implemented a lot of lighting controls, occupancy sensors, daylight sensors, and things of that nature in the labs to bring down the energy usage and Lumen really knew their way around those systems.”

Jim Herr
Rafael Viñoly Architects
 

“We worked with Lighting By Gregory who helped us get the most energy efficient fixtures for the Sunshine Bronx Business Incubator. We as architects know what’s out there, but Lighting By Gregory opened our eyes to more LED opportunities.”

Harel Edery
Mosza

 
Inverted Warehouse Townhouse / Paul Warchol Photography / Dean/Wolf Architects (left); Museum of the Moving Image / Peter Aaron/Esto / Leeser Architecture (right).
Paul Warchol Photography (left) AND peter aaron/esto (right)
 

Photography

 

Esto Photographics
222 Valley Pl.,
Mamaroneck, NY;
914-698-4060

Halkin Architectural Photography
915 Spring Garden St.,
Philadelphia;
215-236-3922

Iwan Baan
Schippersgracht 7-1,
Amsterdam;
+31-06-54-630468

Jock Pottle Photography
259 West 30th St.,
New York;
212-760-1466

 

JoPo Photography
504 East 12th St.,
New York;
212-614-3122

Michael Moran Photography
98 4th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-237-8830

Nic Lehoux
604-874-0918

Paul Warchol Photography
224 Centre St.,
New York;
212-431-3461

 

Scott Frances
79 Broadway,
New York;
212-777-0099

T.G. Olcott Photography
2 Greglen Ave.,
Nantucket, MA;
508-360-6312

Ty Cole Photography
332 Bleeker St.,
New York;
212-777-0075


 
City Center Facade Restoation / Boston Valley / Terra Cotta  / dattner architects (left); Tashan / Stone Source / Archi-tectonics (right).
Aislinn Weidele/Ennead Architects (left) AND don pearse photopgraphers (right)
 

Concrete, Masonry, Stone, & Tile

 

ADM Concrete Construction
9726 99th St.,
Ozone Park, NY;
718-738-1186

American Orlean

American Precast Concrete
PO Box 328,
Floresville, TX;
830-393-7731

Art In Construction
55 Washington St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-222-3874

Blenko Glass Company
P.O. Box 67, Milton, WV;
877-425-3656

Boston Valley Terra Cotta
6860 South Abbott Rd.,
Orchard Park, NY;
716-649-7490

Cathedral Stone Products
7266 Park Circle Dr.,
Hanover, MD;
410-782-9150

Commodore
230 South 5th Ave.,
Mt. Vernon, NY;
914-297-3000

Extech Industries
87 Bowne St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-852-7090

Fusion Floors
Buford, GA;
704-775-1050

Get Real Surfaces
143 West 29th St.,
New York;
212-414-1620

 

Helical Line Products
659 Miller Rd.,
Avon Lake, OH;
440-933-9263

James J. Totaro & Associates
95-1047 Ala'oki St.,
Mililani, HI;
808-626-9500

Kings County Waterproofing and Masonry
1200 Utica Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-629-6300

L&L Stone & Tile
900 South Oyster Bay Rd.,
Hicksville, NY;
516-349-1900

Masonry Solutions
PO Box 1036,
Sparks, MD;
410-771-1922

Modern Mosaic
8620 Oakwood Dr.,
Niagara Falls, ON, Canada;
905-356-3045

North Carolina Granite Corporation
P.O. Box 151,
Mount Airy, NC;
336-786-5141

Pavestone
18 Cowan Dr.,
Middleboro, MA;
508-947-6001

Porcelanosa
600 Route 17 North,
Ramsey, NJ;
201-995-1310

Port Morris Tile & Marble
1285 Oakpoint Ave.,
Bronx, New York;
718-378-6100

 

Reginald D. Hough Concrete Construction
115 Montgomery St.,
Rhinebeck, NY;
845-876-1048

RNC Industries
770-368-8453

Roman Mosaic and Tile Company
1105 Saunders Ct.,
West Chester, PA;
610-692-3100

Savema
Via Aurelia 24-55045,
Pietrasanta, Italy;
+39-0584-794407

Sheldon Slate
143 Fox Rd.,
Middle Granville, NY;
518-642-1280

Speranza Brickwork
15 High St.,
Whitehouse Station, NJ;
908-534-2176

Stepstone
800-572-9029

Stone Source
215 Park Ave. South,
New York;
212-979-6400

The Pike Company
One Circle St.,
Rochester, NY;
585-271-5256

Vermont Structural Slate Company
3 Prospect St.,
Fair Haven, VT;
800-343-1900

Zanaglia
Via Longobarda 19,
Massa, Italy;
+39-0585-834566


Milstein Hall / Reginald Hough/The Pike Company / OMA.
Philippe Ruault
 

“Peter Dagostino at ADM Concrete made it possible to get the building up. He coordinated everything. ADM is a very smart company and did a quick job.”

Werner Morath
Loadingdock 5
 

Boston Valley is one of the premier companies to go to for very careful matching of terracotta.”

Joe Coppola
Dattner Architects
 

“The excellent stone work by Port Morris Tile & Marble helped us make this a place of permanence and beauty. They worked with our vision and found the spectacular green marble for the benches.”

Tod Williams
Tod Williams Billie Tsien

 

“The slate siding from Vermont Structural Slate was naturally resistant to spray paint.”

Amy Yang
Toshiko Mori
 

“We used Reginald Hough as a concrete consultant for Milstein Hall. They came in during construction process to facilitate the subcontractor, Pike, and help us to decide on some of the materials to test and techniques to use. The lower levels have a smooth concrete dome ceiling with integrated lighting. Because it is both architecture and structure, it required a very precise installation method. Hough was invaluable in achieving that.”

Ziad Shehab
OMA


DiMenna Center for Classical Music / Akustiks / H3/Hardy Collaboration Architecture.
francis dzikowski/esto
 

Consultants

 

A/V & Acoustics


Acentech
33 Moulton St.,
Cambridge, MA;
617-499-8000

Acoustic Dimensions
145 Huguenot St.,
New Rochelle, NY;
914-712-1300

Akustiks
93 North Main St.,
South Norwalk, CT;
203-299-1904

Clarity Custom
1792 West 11th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-787-9699

DHV
Laan 1914 no 35, 3818 EX
Amersfoort, The Netherlands;
+31-33-468-2000

Electrosonic
318 West 39th St.,
New York;
212-206-7711

Jaffe Holden Acoustics
114–A Washington St.,
Norwalk, CT;
203-838-4167

Kirkegaard Associates
801 W. Adams St.,
Chicago;
312-441-1980

Polysonics
405 Belle Air Ln.,
Warrenton, VA;
540-341-4988

Scharff/Weisberg
36-36 33rd St.,
Long Island City, NY;
212-582-2345

Blast Consultant


RSA Protective Technologies
1573 Mimosa Ct.,
Upland, CA;
909-946-0964

Commissioning


Strategic Building Solutions
708 3rd Ave., New York;
212-209-1037

Cost Estimator


VJ Associates
100 Duffy Ave.,
Hicksville, NY;
516-932-1010

Fire Protection/ Code Consulting


Code Consultants Professional Engineers
215 West 40th St.,
New York;
212-216-9596

JAM Consultants
104 West 29th St.,
New York;
212-627-1050

 

Montroy Andersen DeMarco
99 Madison Ave.,
New York;
212-481-5900

Property Intervention Consultants
72 Reade St.,
New York;
212-267-4666

Food Facility Planning


JGL Foodservice Consultants
224 Cleveland Ln.,
Princeton NJ;
732-274-1694

Green Wall


Vertical Garden Technology
954 Lexington Ave.,
New York;
646-339-6222

Historic Preservation


Building Conservation Associates
44 East 32nd St.,
New York;
212-777-1300

Office for Metropolitan History
11 West 20th St.,
New York;
212-799-0520

Powers and Company
211 North 13th St.,
Philadelphia;
215-636-0192

PreCon LogStrat
PO Box 417,
Mastic Beach, NY;
631-772-9540

IT/Telecommunications


Archi-Technology
115 Metro Park,
Rochester, NY;
585-424-1952

TM Technology Partners
250 West 39th St.,
New York;
212-398-2424

Laboratory Planning


Jacobs Consultancy
70 Wood Ave., Iselin, NJ;
732-452-9200

Landmarks


Higgins Quasebarth & Partners
11 Hanover Sq.,
New York;
212-274-9468

 

Owners Representative


Levien & Company
570 Lexington Ave.,
New York;
212-702-0888

Radiant Consulting Services


The Stone House
1111 Route 9,
Garrison, NY;
845-788-3620

Security


Ducibella Venter & Santore
250 State St.,
North Haven, CT;
203-288-6490

The Clarient Group
630 9th Ave.,
New York;
212-586-5840

Tritech Communications
28-30 West 36th St.,
New York;
212-695-1880

Specifications


Heller & Metzger
11 Dupont Cr. NW,
Washington, DC;
202-364-2222

Theatrical


Fischer Dachs Associates
22 West 19th St.,
New York;
212-691-3020

North American Theatrix
60 Industrial Dr.,
Southington, CT;
860-863-4112

Turf and Sports Regulations


Stantec
1735 Market St.,
Philadelphia;
215-751-2900

Vertical Transportation


Van Deusen & Associates
7 Penn Plz.,
New York;
212-868-9090

Wind Analysis


CPP
1415 Blue Spruce Dr.,
Fort Collins, CO;
970-221-3371


Penn Park / Stantec / michael van valkenburgh associates.
Courtesy UPenn
 

Acoustic Dimensions was great. They were really hands on, heavily involved in the Nitehawk. We have apartments above the movie theater so acoustic isolation is a big part of this project. They designed the second floor’s ceiling to hang on springs. They also tested the sound transmission when it was all done and you can’t hear a thing.”

Stephen Lynch
Caliper Studio

 

Richard Demarco is the most informed architect in New York City about building code and law. This guy is a joy to work with.”

Henry Smith-Miller
Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects
 

Clarity Custom is a terrific 'full system' provider and installer who took the lead on specifying A/V equipment and lighting control systems. There was an excellent interface with the general contractor and architect to minimize coordination issues. Clarity did a great job of integrating hardware, wiring and controls in a project where every detail matters.”

Charles Wolf
Dean/Wolf Architects

 

Building Conservation Associates have areas of expertise that bring refinement and an ability to find the resources.”

Joe Coppola
Dattner Architects
 

“At the Museum of the Moving Image, Scharff/ Weisberg and Jaffe Holden had a real hand in setting the stage to accommodate different uses in terms of all the data and audio visual systems that allow the museum to be a plug + play environment.”

Simon Arnold
Leeser Architecture

 

Bob Powers is very keen in navigating the historic restoration tax break. He's tech savvy and politically savvy, which helps get city, state, and federal approvals.”

Frank Grauman
Bohlin Cywinski Jackson
 

“Laurent Corradi of Vertical Garden Technology has created two grand and beautiful green walls that are loved by all. His knowledge of the botany and technical aspects of plant walls will insure that these features will thrive for generations to come.”

Tod Williams
Tod Williams + Billie Tsien

 

“The Musuem of the Moving Image faced a lot of challenges not to mention being a publicly-funded project in hard economic times. Levien took it all in stride and helped us meet the extra demands on budget cutting without sacrificing quality.”

Simon Arnold
Leeser Architecture

Other Services & Suppliers

 

Arborist


Paul Cowie Associates
11 Beverwyck Rd.,
Lake Hiawatha, NJ;
973-263-4801

Art Restoration


Rustin Levenson Art Conservation
212-594-8862

Artist


Michael Singer

Casework


Lab Crafters
2085 5th Ave.,
Ronkonkoma, NY;
631-471-7755

Curtain Design


Inside Outside Petra Blaisse
Erste Nassaustraat 5, 1052 BD
Amsterdam, The Netherlands;
+31-20-6810-801

Custom Fabrication


Associated Fabrication
72 North 15th St.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-387-4530

Custom Materials


Panelite
5835 Adams Blvd.,
Culver City, CA;
212-947-8292

Electrical


Arthur Metzler and Associates
47 Hillside Ave.,
Manhasset, NY;
516-365-6966

Graphic Design/Signage & Wayfinding


2 X 4
180 Varick St.,
New York;
212-647-1170

Amuneal Manufacturing Corp.
4737 Darrah St.,
Philadelphia;
215-743-1715

C & G Partners
116 East 16th St.,
New York;
212-532-4460

Duggal
29 West 23rd St.,
New York;
212-242-7000

Entro Communications
122 Parliament St.,
Toronto, Ontario, Canada;
416-368-6988

Karlssonwilker
36 6th Ave.,
New York;
212-929-8064

Pentagram Design
204 Fifth Ave.,
New York;

Enclosure Testing / Facade Maintenance


Architectural Testing
130 Derry Ct.,
York, PA;
717-764-7700

 

Entek Engineering
166 Ames St.,
Hackensack, NJ;
201-820-2802

Epoxy Specialists and Supply


Aspen Supply Corp.
888-866-5757

Felt artist


Claudy Jongstra

Finishes and Coatings


Creative Finishes
27 West 20th St.,
New York;
212-929-6920

Fountain Consultant


Dan Euser Waterarchitecture
58 Major Mackenize Dr. West,
Richmond Hill, ON, Canada;
905-884-4176

Heat Recovery Ventilator


Zehnder
540 Portsmouth Ave.,
Greenland, NH;
603-422-6700

Interior Decoration


Pamela Banker Associates
136 East 57th St.,
New York;
212-308-5030

Irrigation Distributor


Storr Tacktor
175 13th Ave.,
Ronkonkoma, NY;
631-588-5222

Landscaping


Capri Landscaping
4005 Victory Blvd.,
Staten Island, NY;
718-494-8973

Plant Specialists
42-45 Vernon Blvd.,
Queens;
718-392-9404

Light Fixture Restoration


Robert True Ogden
3311 Broadway St. NE,
Minneapolis, MN;
612-524-3432

Modular Units


Capsys
63 Flushing Ave.,
Brooklyn, NY;
718-403-0050

Murals


Stingray Studios
2144 Citygate Dr.,
Columbus, OH;
614-220-8878

 

Nursery


Shemin Nurseries
42 Old Ridgebury Rd.,
Danbury, CT;
203-207-5000

Painting & Epoxy Installation


Anton Berisaj
917-440-4262

Plastic Lumber


Tangent Technologies
1001 Sullivan Rd.,
Aurora, IL
630-264-1110

Plastics


E&T Plastics
45-45 37th St.,
Long Island City, NY;
800-221-9555

Radiant Systems


Barcol-Air
115 Hurley Rd.,
Oxford, CT;
203-262 9900

Riggers to the Arts


Dun-Rite
1561 Southern Blvd.,
Bronx, NY;
718-991-1100

Security


S.O.S. Advanced Security
197 7th Ave.,
New York;
212-206-7777

Security Bollards/ Traffic Barriers


Delta Scientific
40355 Delta La.,
Palmdale, CA;
661-575-1100

Moli Metal
8380 Rue Lafrenaie
Montreal, QC;
514-326-6839

Theatrical Equipment


Gerriets International
130 Winterwood Ave.,
Ewing, NJ;
609-771-8111

Vertical Transportation


Persohn / Hahn Associates
908 Town & Country Blvd.,
Houston, TX;
713-467-4440

Waterproofing Systems


Sika Sarnafil
100 Dan Rd.,
Canton, MA;
781-828-5400

 
museum of the moving image / karlssonwilker / leeser architecture (left); Metrotech / Delta Scientific / WXY (right).
peter aaron/esto (left) AND courtesy wxy (right)
 

“At Queens Plaza, we collaborated with Michael Singer, an artist whose commitment to the public realm complements Margie Ruddick's environmental sensibility for landscape. He designed and produced special pre-cast components integrated into the architecture of new social spaces that withstand the site's powerful infrastructural presence.”

Linda Pollak
Marpillero Pollak Architects
 

Claudy Jongtstra’s artistry is present in two monumental tapestries that cover both long walls of the Atrium. These extraordinary artworks were made possible by her artistic vision as much as her involvement in the technical aspect, managing all from Europe.”

Tod Williams
Tod Williams + Billie Tsien Architects

 

“Fountain consultant Dan Euser is really familiar with the potentials and limits of water dynamics. He's visionary in terms of creating things of beauty and simplicity.”

Matthew Donham
PWP Landscape Architecture
 

“When the graphic designers Karlssonwilker joined the team, the design of the Museum of the Moving Image was fairly well resolved, but they were able to complement and add to its strength in a way that carried through the branding of the entire institution”

Simon Arnold
Leeser Architecture

 

“The reception desk at the Sunshine Bronx Business Incubator is custom designed and Panelite made it easy for me because they built a model on site for approval and I was able to see our 3-D computer drawings in real life before the desk was fabricated.”

Harel Edery
Mosza
Placeholder Alt Text

Block By Block
Courtesy Cultural Landscape Foundation

The story of New York development in recent years has been defined by mega-projects, the large-scale urban moves unleashed by a rip-roaring market, sweeping rezonings, and once-in-a-generation super-deals. But the current economic meltdown has made for a very different mood. Certainly not chastened—this is still New York, after all—but circumspect, even cautious. A number of ambitious projects we featured here in the past—the proliferating towers at Queens West, or the 14-acre Sky View Parc in Flushing—are still gallantly moving ahead. Yet other grand plans have been parceled out in phases, pared back, or quietly put on ice.

To take stock of this changing landscape, we’ve gathered a selection of new projects—large and small, flashy and unfussy—that are filling in the streetscape and skyline, from hotspots like Williamsburg to newly beckoning corners of the Bronx. Together they offer a portrait of a city shaped less by the bravado of master builders than the block-by-block business of architecture. And that might not be a bad thing at all.

Produced by Jeff Byles, Danielle Rago, and Olivia Chen.

All images courtesy respective developers.

 

Manhattan

Above 59th Street 

37-41 HILLSIDE AVENUE
Location: 37-41 Hillside Avenue
Developer: North Manhattan
Construction Company
Architect: Johnson Jones and
Mario A. Canteros
Size: 16 floors, 89 units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2010


AMSTERDAM AVENUE SITE
Location: Amsterdam Avenue and West 100th Street
Developer: TBA
Architect: SLCE Architects
Size: 56 units, 72,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2010 


180 EAST 93RD STREET
Location: 180 East 93rd Street
Developer: Greystone Property Development
Architect: Barry Rice Architect
Size: 7 floors, 9 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


535 WEST END AVENUE
Location: 535 West End Avenue
Developer: Extell Development Company
Architect: Lucien Lagrange Architects
Size: 20 floors, 22 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


GEORGICA
Location: 305 East 85th Street
Developer: The Ascend Group
Architect: Cetra/Ruddy
Size: 20 floors, 58 units, 134,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


2075 BROADWAY
Location: 2075 Broadway
Developer: 2075 Holdings
Architect: Handel Architects
Size: 19 floors, 196 units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


Manhattan

Between 14th Street
and 59th Street 

250 EAST 57TH STREET
Location: 250 East 57th Street
Developer: World-Wide Group
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 2 buildings, 13 floors and 58 floors
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011–2013


1775 BROADWAY
Location: 1775 Broadway
Developer: Moinian Group
Architect: Gensler
Size: 26 floors, 625,000 sq. ft.
Type: Commercial (reclad)
Completion (est.): 2009


250 WEST 55TH STREET
Location: 250 West 55th Street
Developer: Boston Properties
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 40 floors, 1 million sq. ft.
Type: Commercial
Completion (est.): 2010


800 10TH AVENUE
Location: 800 10th Avenue
Developer: Alchemy Properties
Architect: FXFowle
Size: 96 units, 130,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential (conversion)
Completion (est.): 2010


CLINTON PARK
Location: 770 11th Avenue
Developer: Two Trees Management
Architect: TEN Arquitectos
Size: 911 units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011


53W53RD
Location: 53 West 53rd Street
Developer: Hines Interests
Architect: Ateliers Jean Nouvel
Size: 75 floors, 120 condominium units, 100 hotel rooms, 50,000 sq. ft. gallery expansion
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2012


55 WEST 46TH STREET
Location: 55 West 46th Street
Developer: Extell Development Company
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 40 floors, 800,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011


455 WEST 37TH STREET
Location: 455 West 37th Street
Developer: Rockrose Development
Architect: Handel Architects
Size: 23 floors with two levels of underground parking, 421,164 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


HUDSON YARDS
Location: West 30th to West 33rd streets, 10th to 12th avenues
Developer: Related Companies
Architects include: Kohn Pedersen Fox, Arquitectonica, Robert A.M. Stern Architects, Elkus Manfredi Architects
Size: Approximately 5,000 units, 5.3 million sq. ft. (residential), 5.5 million sq. ft. (commercial), 1 million sq. ft. (retail and hotel)
Type: Mixed-use
Completion Phase I (est.): 2014


450 HUDSON BOULEVARD
Location: 450 Hudson Boulevard
Developer: Alloy Development
Architect: Della Valle Bernheimer and Architecture Research Office
Size: 1.1 million sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2013


MANHATTAN WEST
Location: 9th Avenue between West 33rd and West 31st streets
Developer: Brookfield Properties
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 5 million sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2013


316 11TH AVENUE
Location: 316 11th Avenue at 30th Street
Developer: Douglaston Development
Architect: The Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Size: 34 floors, 369 units, 387,500 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


GANSEVOORT PARK
Location: 420 Park Avenue South at 29th Street
Developer: Gansevoort Hotel Group with Centurion Realty
Architect: The Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Size: 18 floors, 225 units, 200,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


HL23
Location: 515 West 23rd Street
Developer: Alf Naman Real Estate Advisors
Architect: Neil M. Denari Architects
Size: 14 floors, 11 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


ALMA
Location: 30 West 21st Street
Developer: Beck Street Capital
Architect: Karl Fischer Architect
Size: 11 floors, 11 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


15 UNION SQUARE WEST
Location: 15 Union Square West
Developer: Brack Capital Real Estate
Architect: Office for Design and Architecture with Perkins Eastman
Size: 12 floors, 36 units, 97,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


PRIMA
Location: 130 West 20th Street
Developer: EG West 20th
Architect: H. Thomas O’Hara Architect
Size: 36 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


57 IRVING PLACE
Location: 57 Irving Place
Developer: Madison Equities
Architect: Audrey Matlock Architect
Size: 12 floors, 9 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009

 

 

Manhattan

Below 14th Street

385 WEST 12TH STREET
Location: 385 West 12th Street
Developer: FLAnk
Architect: FLAnk
Size: 7 floors, 12 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


THE LEE
Location: East Houston Street at Pitt Street
Developer: Common Ground
Architect: Kiss + Cathcart, Architects
Size: 12 floors, 263 units, 99,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


350 WEST BROADWAY
Location: 350 West Broadway
Developer: RFR Holding
Architect: Moed de Armas & Shannon
Size: 10 floors, 8 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


BOWERY RESIDENCES
Location: 351 Bowery
Developer: 351 Bowery Associates
Architect: Scarano Architect
Size: 15 floors, 14 units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


FIVE FRANKLIN PLACE
Location: Five Franklin Place
Developer: Sleepy Hudson
Architect: UNStudio
Size: 20 floors, 55 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


99 CHURCH STREET/FOUR SEASONS HOTEL AND PRIVATE RESIDENCES
Location: 99 Church Street
Developer: Silverstein Properties
Architect: Robert A.M. Stern Architects/SLCE Architects
Size: 80 floors, 175 hotel rooms, 143 condominium units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011


375 PEARL STREET
Location: 375 Pearl Street
Developer: Taconic Investment Partners
Architect: Cook + Fox
Size: 32 floors
Type: Commercial (reclad)
Completion (est.): 2009/2010


BEEKMAN TOWER
Location: Beekman Street, between William and Nassau streets
Developer: Forest City Ratner Companies
Architect: Gehry Partners
Size: 76 floors, 903 units, 1.1 million sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2010


NOBU HOTEL AND RESIDENCES
Location: 45 Broad Street
Developer: Swig Equities
Architect: Rockwell Group/Moed de Armas & Shannon Architects
Size: 62 floors, 77 units, 128 hotel rooms
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2010


Brooklyn

TOREN
Location: 150 Myrtle Avenue
Developer: BFC Partners
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 37 floors, 240 units, 260,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


HOTEL INDIGO
Location: 237 Duffield Street
Developer: V3 Hotels
Architect: Karl Fischer Architect
Size: 22 floors, 172 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2010


166 MONTAGUE STREET
Location: 166 Montague Street
Developer: United Management Realty
Architect: RKT&B
Size: 10 floors, 24 units
Type: Mixed-use (conversion)
Completion (est.): 2009


PARK TOWER
Location: 33 Lincoln Road
Developer: Henry Herbst
Architect: Gilman Architects
Size: 23 floors, 90 units, 180,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2010


80 DEKALB
Location: 80 DeKalb Avenue
Developer: Forest City Ratner Companies
Architect: Costas Kondylis and Partners
Size: 34 floors, 365 units, 333,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


ATLANTIC AVENUE
Location: Atlantic Avenue and Eastern Parkway
Developer: Habitat for Humanity
Architect: Dattner Architects
Size: 3 buildings, 4 floors, 41 units, 53,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


GOWANUS GREEN
Location: 5th and Smith streets
Developer: Gowanus Green Partnership
Architect: Rogers Marvel Architects
Size: 774 units, 675,000 sq. ft. (residential)
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2014


GOWANUS CANAL HOUSING
Location: Bond Street between Union and Degraw streets
Developer: Gowanus Canal Joint Venture
Architect: RKT&B
Size: 11 buildings, 350 units, 355,000 s.f. (residential), 10,000 s.f. (commercial)
Type: Mixed-use
Completion: In design


80 METROPOLITAN
Location: 80 Metropolitan Avenue, Williamsburg
Developer: Steiner NYC
Architect: GreenbergFarrow
Size: 6 floors, 123 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


Queens

L HAUS
Location: 11-02 49th Avenue, Long Island City
Developer: The Stahl Organization
Architect: Cetra/Ruddy
Size: 122 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


THE STAR TOWER
Location: 28-02 42nd Road, Long Island City
Developer: Roe Development Corporation
Architect: DeArch
Size: 25 floors, 180 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


10 COURT SQUARE
Location: 10 Court Square, Long Island City
Developer: Rockrose Development
Architect: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill
Size: 25 floors, 961,698 sq. ft.
Type: Commercial with ground-floor retail
Completion (est.): 2011


MURRAY PARK
Location: 11-25 45th Avenue, Long Island City
Developer: TerraMax
Architect: Fogarty Finger
Size: 7 floors, 28 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2010


EAST COAST 4
Location: Queens West Site 2 at Center Boulevard
Developer: Rockrose Development
Architect: Arquitectonica
Size: 39 floors, 737 units, 1.1 million sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011


ARVERNE BY THE SEA TOWN CENTER
Location: Rockaway Beach Boulevard between Beach 67th and Beach 69th streets
Developer: Benjamin Beechwood
Architect: Ehrenkrantz Eckstut & Kuhn Architects
Size: 28,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009


Bronx

COURTLANDT CORNERS
Location: East 161st Street between Courtlandt and Melrose avenues
Developer: The Phipps Houses Group
Architect: Dattner Architects
Size: 323 units, 362,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2010


BORICUA VILLAGE
Location: East 163rd Street and 3rd Avenue
Developer: Atlantic Development Group
Architect: Hugo S. Subotovsky Architects
Size: 7 buildings, 8 to 13 floors, 689 units, 47,000 sq. ft. retail
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2009/2010


THE SOLARA
Location: 1259 & 1275 Grant Avenue
Developer: Grant/Briarwood
Architect: Danois Architects
Size: 2 buildings, 10 floors, 160 units
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


TIFFANY STREET APARTMENTS
Location: 922 East 169th Street and 1140 Tiffany Street
Developer: Atlantic Development Group
Architect: Atelier 22
Size: 2 buildings, 8 floors, 94 units, 110,000 sq. ft.
Type: Residential
Completion (est.): 2009


ST. ANN'S TERRACE
Location: St. Ann’s Avenue and East 159th Street
Developer: Jackson Development Group
Architect: Hugo S. Subotovsky Architects
Size: 8 buildings, 8 to 13 floors, 600 units
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2011


KINGSBRIDGE ARMORY
Location: 29 West Kingsbridge Road
Developer: Related Companies
Architect: GreenbergFarrow
Size: 5.6 acres, 550,000 sq. ft.
Type: Mixed-use
Completion (est.): 2013

 

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Power Grid

Manhattan
Below 14th Street


8 Union Square South
Location: 8 Union Square South
Developer: Claremont Group
Architect(s): Arpad Baksa Architects
Consultant(s): Severud Associates, Lazlo Bodak Engineers, Eric Cohler Design, Inc., D.T.M., Inc.
Size: 15 floors, 20 units, 52,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.): Summer 2007



This condominium will replace the Morris Lapidussdesigned Odd Lots store on the corner of University Place and Union Square South, which was recently demolished. The new building is made of white pre-cast concrete and has floor to ceiling aluminum windows wrapping its northeast side. this new amenity.



137 Wooster
Location: 137 Wooster Street
Developer: Arun Bhatia Development Corporation
Architect(s): Beyer Blinder Belle Architects and Planners
Consultant(s): Goldstein Associates, Ettinger Engineering Associates, M. Paul Friedberg and Partners
Size:6 floors, 10 units, 37,500 sq. ft.
Completion (est.): January 2007



In 2003, the zoning changed to allow residential development in the SoHo Historic District on a case-by-case basis, and this is one of the first projects to be approved. The building consists of two distinct masses, one on Wooster Street and one on West Broadway, each tailored to its specific street frontage.



Trump SoHo
Location:246 Spring Street
Developer: Bayrock Group and the Sapir Organization
Architect(s): Handel Architects, The Rockwell Group
Consultant(s): The Trump Organization
Size:42 floors, 386,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.): 2009



Donald Trump has shifted his gaze downtown with a project on the corner of Spring and Varick streets. The mixed-use development will combine a hotel and condos in a 42-story tower set atop a base that will be open to the public. Some community groups are concerned that housing is being introduced into a mostly manufacturing district.



4400442 West 14th Street
Location:4400442 West 14th Street
Developer: Diane von Furstenberg
Architect(s): WORK AC
Consultant(s): Goldstein Associates, Americon Contractors, Tillotson Lighting, Bellapart
Size:5 floors, 30,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):December 2006



Work AC gutted an existing red brick building abutting the High Line to make way for fashion giant Diane von Furstenberg's flagship store and studios. On top of the old building they added two floors: The first additional level is glass topped with aluminum fascia; the more sculptural second level is made of alternating clear and translucent glass.



Norfolk Lofts
Location:115 Norfolk Street
Developer: Zeyad Aly
Architect(s):Grzywinski Pons Architects
Consultant(s): Unavailable
Size:7 floors, 22 units, 22,800 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Fall 2007



Grzywinski Pons is working on a seven-story condominium building near the Hotel on Rivington on the Lower East Side, the young firm's first major project. The glass facade reveals a large atrium which serves as a source of light and air for units not facing the street.



Thompson and Broome
Location:520 Broome Street
Developer:Donald Zucker Organization
Architect(s):The Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Consultant(s):Rosenwasser Grossman
Size:9 floors, 51 units, 73,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Pending approval



A 2004 change in SoHo's zoning allowing the construction of residential buildings on parking lots paved the way for this condo building, which could soon replace a 1922 three-story parking structure. The area is zoned for commercial use, but the developer has applied for a variance. A decision will be announced this fall.



27 Wooster Street
Location:27 Wooster Street
Developer:Axel Strawski/Tony Leichter
Architect(s):Smith-Miller + Hawkinson
Consultant(s):Robert Sillman Associates, Jack Green & Associates, R.A. Heintges Architects
Size:8 floors, 22 units, 60,000 sq.ft.
Completion (est.):2008



This SoHo loft building, which is just west of Jean Nouvel's building at 40 Mercer Street, has eight floors and not a single common corridor. Elevators open to each individual unit. The architects kept the building thin to give each unit maximum street and courtyard exposure.



40 Bond Street
Location:Ian Schrager Company and RFR Holdings
Developer:Axel Strawski/Tony Leichter
Architect(s):Herzog & de Meuron Architekten, Handel Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:11 floors, 33 units
Completion (est.):2007



Herzog & de Meuron's much-lauded project just north of Houston Street is their first residential commission in the United States. According to developer Ian Schrager, the cast glass mullions of the facade are the architect's reinterpretation off and homage tooLouis Sullivan's 1899 Bayard-Condict Building on Bleecker Street.



123 Washington Street
Location:Ian Schrager Company and RFR Holdings
Developer:The Moinian Group
Architect(s):Gwathmey Siegel & Associates
Consultant(s):Cosentini Associates, Gilsanz Murray Steficek, Ravarini McGovern Construction
Size:53 floors, 220 hotel rooms, 180 condo units, 440,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Winter 2007



The Moinian Group recently received $50 million in Liberty Bond financing for this hotel and condominium tower next to the soon-to-be demolished Deutsche Bank building in Lower Manhattan.



Manhattan
Above 59th Street


411 East 115th Street
Location:411 East 115th Street
Developer:Jeffrey Berger
Architect(s):Grzywinski Pons Architects
Consultant(s): Unavailable
Size: 7 floors, 31 units, 31,400 sq. ft.
Completion (est.): Fall 2007



Situated on a through-lot with exposures on 115th and 116th streets, this condominium's two street facades belong to two separate buildings, linked at the center of the lot with a skybridge. This enabled the two structures to share a circulation core with one elevator and one main lobby.



Kalahari Apartments
Location:40 West 116th Street
Developer:L& M Equity Participants, Full Spectrum
Architect(s):GF55, Schwartz Architects, Studio JTA
Consultant(s): Unavailable
Size: 12 floors, 249 units, 54,184 sq. ft.
Completion (est.): Fall 2007



The facade pattern on these two linked buildings derives from three sub-Saharan culturessthe Ndebele of South Africa, the Ashanti of Ghana, and the nomadic Bushmen of the Kalahari Desert. According to its designers, the project's symbolism is a response to the need for an African-American awareness of and contribution to architecture and urban planning..



111 Central Park North
Location:111 Central Park North
Developer:The Athena Group
Architect(s):The Hillier Group
Consultant(s):SLCE Architects, Bovis Lend-Lease Construction
Size: 19 floors, 47 units, 87,500 sq. ft. residential, 8,700 sq. ft. retail
Completion (est.): Fall 2007



Hillier's architects took advantage of the fact that this building is the first residential highrise on Central Park North and made sure all 47 units, most with balconies, had unimpeded views of the park. An oversized second-floor outdoor garden and common terrace continues the arboreal theme.



The Rushmore
Location:80 Riverside Boulevard
Developer:Extell Development Corporation
Architect(s):Costas Kondylis and Partners
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size: 41 floors, 289 units, 657,000 sq. ft
Completion (est.): 2008



Initially part of the massive Trump Place complex along Riverside Boulevard, the Rushmore was sold to Extell, which modified some of the floor plans to create larger units. Rising from a massive, block-long base, the Rushmore's twin towers echo a popular Upper West Side design motif, seen most recently at the Time Warner Center.



The Avery
Location:100 Riverside Boulevard
Developer:Extell Development Corporation
Architect(s):SLCE Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:32 floors, 274 units
Completion (est.):Fall 2007



Using its name to establish a connection to the Avery Fisher Hall in nearby Lincoln Center, the Avery echoes the art deco towers that line Central Park West. The complex will feature cultural programming and provide residents special access to the performing arts center.



120 West 72nd Street
Location:120 West 72nd Street
Developer:Anbau Enterprises
Architect(s):BKSK Architects
Consultant(s):Goldstein Associates, Laszlo Bodak Engineer, Higgins & Quasebarth
Size:16 floors, 22 units, 60,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Fall 2007



Using its name to establish a connection to the Avery Fisher Hall in nearby Lincoln Center, the Avery echoes the art deco towers that line Central Park West. The complex will feature cultural programming and provide residents special access to the performing arts center.



Manhattan
Between 14th Street and 59th Street


310 East 53rd Street
Location:310 East 53rd Street
Developer:Macklowe Properties
Architect(s):Moed de Armas & Shannon Architects; SLCE Architects
Consultant(s):Sota Glazing Inc.
Size:31 floors, 88 units
Completion (est.):2007



Perched on a three-story limestone pedestal, this residential buildinghas a 28-story glass curtain wall with balconies conceived as extensions of the interior. Its apartments are larger than the average in Midtown; the smallest measure 1,600 square feet.



405 West 53rd Street
Location:405 West 53rd Street
Developer:SDS Procida
Architect(s):Smith-Miller + Hawkinson Architects
Consultant(s):Severud Associates, Montroy Andersen Demarco Design Group Inc., Sideris Engineers P.C., Engle Associates
Size:7 floors, 82 units, 201,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2008



Henry Smith-Miller freely acknowledges this condominium's debt to Le Corbusier's Unitt de Habitation in Marseille. But its New York provenance shows: Maisonettes on the ground floor are shielded from the street by a curtain of steel, creating small courtyards like those that typically front brownstones.



325 Fifth Avenue
Location:325 Fifth Avenue
Developer:Douglaston Developer and Continental Properties
Architect(s):Stephen B. Jacobs Group
Consultant(s):Levine Builders, WSP Cantor Seinuk, Andi Pepper Interior Design, Thomas Balsley Associates, Israel Berger & Associates
Size:41 floors, 250 units, 390,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Late 2006



Directly across from the Empire State Building, this new condo-minium will have a limestone pedestal along the street, and a 41-story tower above. The glass faaade features voluntary, multiple set-backs; most of the units have balconies.



241 Fifth Avenue
Location:241 Fifth Avenue
Developer:241 Fifth Avenue, LLC
Architect(s):Perkins Eastman
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:20 floors, 60,000 sq. ft.


Since the Madison Square Park area was recently declared an historic district, Perkins Eastman had to meet strict guidelines in designing this 20-story highrise. Floors 1 to 15 will be flush with its neighbors on Fifth Avenue, while floors 16 to 20 will be set back from the street. The site is currently for sale, and includes the building plans.



The Atelier
Location:635 West 42nd Street
Developer:Moinian Group, MacFarlane Partners
Architect(s):Costas Kondylis and Partners
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:46 floors, 478 units, 520,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2007
Budget: $200 million



Atelier's 15,700 square feet of ground-floor retail space will be topped with a veritable city of studios and condos, featuring wraparound balconies and expansive views. Atelier recalls the bow of a great ship,, said architect Costas Kondylis, interpreted in glass..



610 Lexington Avenue
Location:610 Lexington Avenue
Developer:RFR Holdings
Architect(s):Foster and Partners
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:(80 condos, 50 hotel rooms), 257,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Late 2008



RFR Parners' Aby Rosen and Michael Fuchs transferred the air rights from their more famous neighbor (and property) on 53rd StreettMies van der Rohe's Seagram's Buildinggto allow Norman Foster's tower to take the form of a continuous, thin upright slab without setbacks. It will house condos and an upscale hotel.



548 West 29th Street
Location:548 West 29th Street
Developer:West LLC
Architect(s):Caliper Design
Consultant(s): GMS LLP, John Guth Engineering
Size:12 floors, 18 units
Completion (est.):Late 2007



This top-heavy building starts out narrow, rising on a 25-foot-by-100-foot Chelsea lot, but at the sixth floor, it starts to widen, cantilevering over its neighbors to the east and west. Caliper Design principal Stephen Lynch explained that the faaade is clad in a custom-designed metal panel system that provides an irregular texture to the building's surface.



Sky House
Location:11 East 29th Street
Developer:Clarett Group
Architect(s):FXFowle Architects
Consultant(s):ABR Construction
Size:55 floors, 139 units, 580,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2007



This highrise uses air rights from the 1849 Church of the Transfiguration next door, and sits atop a new glazed parish house. The lot's 50-foot street frontage and 100-foot depth determined the tower's slender profile, which allows only three units per floor. We didn't want the architecture to dominate the site,, said Kirstin Sibilia of FXFowle. Architects chose masonry cladding, Sibilia explained, for its timeless appeal.



459 West 18th Street
Location:459 West 18th Street
Developer:Level 6 Developments
Architect(s):Della Valle + Bernheimer Design
Consultant(s):Robert Silman Associates, Front
Size:11 floors, 13 units, 29,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):January 2008



Rather than look to the past as a reference, Della Valle + Bernheimer chose to respond to the design of an adjacent (and as-yet unbuilt) building by architect Audrey Matlock. [Matlock's] building is all delicate planes and irregular surfaces,, said partner Jared Della Valle. Ours is about mass, determined by the building's L-shaped plan and setbacks..



East River Science Park
Location:29th Street and First Avenue
Developer:Alexandria Real Estate Equities
Architect(s):The Hillier Group
Consultant(s):Stubbins, architect of record; Hargreaves, landscape architect; Tishman Construction, client rep; Turner Construction, construction manager
Size:870,000 gross sq. ft.
Completion (est.):N/A



This city-supported development aims to foster New York's biotech industry by creating a campus in Kips Bay, already home to a high concentration of medical and research facilities. Zoned for bioscience facilities, the 3.7-acre site will accommodate both private companies and public institutions.



10 Chelsea
Location:500 West 23rd Street
Developer:Leviev Boymelgreen
Architect(s):Gerner, Kronick + Valcarcel Architects
Consultant(s):WSP Cantor Seinuk, Lilker Associates, Thornton Thomasetti Group
Size:12 floors, 113,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2007



This mixed-use residential/ commercial building is made of exposed poured-in-place concrete with a dark red aluminum window wall. The glass is a combination of clear glass and insulated translucent glass used as side panels. Amenities include a public terrace overlooking the High Line.



611 Sixth Avenue
Location:611 Sixth Avenuet
Developer:The Brauser Group
Architect(s):Garrett Gourlay Architect
Consultant(s):DeSimone Consulting Engineers, MGJ Associates, Frank Seta
Size:10 floors, 41 units, 3 retail units, 116,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):December 2007



Presently occupied by a three-level garage and a two commercial buildings, this site will soon be home to an eight-story condominium planted on two levels of retail. The black brick building is being being built as-of-right.



Brooklyn
Downtown


110 Livingston Street
Location:110 Livingston Street
Developer:Two Trees Management
Architect(s):Beyer Blinder Belle
Consultant(s): Severud Associates, Lazlo Bodak Engineers, Eric Cohler Design, Inc., D.T.M., Inc.
Size:7 floors, 300 units
Completion (est.):Fall 2006



This 1926 McKim, Mead, and White building was home to the New York City Board of Education for 75 years. Sold by the city in 2003 to Two Trees Management, it is undergoing a major interior renovation which will add four floors to its crown. The challenge was to design interiors that stand up to the magnificence of the facade,, said Jed Walentas of Two Trees Management.



3066313 Gold Street
Location:3066313 Gold Street
Developer:Ron Hershco and Dean Palin
Architect(s):Ismael Leyva Architects
Consultant(s): Rosenwasser Grossman, I.M. Robbins, Flack + Kurtz, Matthews Nielson Landscape
Size:40 floors, 303 units, 400,000 sq. ft.; 35 floors, 214 units, 250,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Winter 2008
Budget:$400 million



As the tallest new residential development in all of Brooklyn, these two mixed-income residential towers will be pivotal in the downtown area's transformation from daytime-only business center to a 24/7 live-work neighborhood.



Thor Tower
Location:Willoughby Square
Developer:Thor Equities
Architect(s):Perkins Eastman
Size:55 floors, 1.2 million sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2008
Budget:$360 million



Willoughby Square, a 1.5-acre plot of land in downtown Brooklyn long condemned by the city, will be the site of a new public park and underground parking garage. Thor Tower, a mixed-use skyscraper, will anchor the park's north side and looks to be the first of several towering projects in the vicinity to break ground.



Brooklyn
North


The Aurora
Location:30 Bayard Street
Developer:The Developer's Group
Architect(s):Karl Fischer Architect
Consultant(s): Unavailable
Size:13 floors, 53 units
Completion (est.):2007



The restoration of Williamsburg's McCarren Park, with new facilities and landscaping, as well as a conversion of a Robert Moses-era public pool into a performance space, will almost certainly encourage additional growth. The newest project is the Aurora, an apartment building which will feature an in-house grocery and delivery service.



North Side Piers
Location:164 Kent Avenue
Developer:Toll Brothers, RD Management, L&M Equity Participants
Architect(s):FXFowle Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:29 floors, 290 units, 350,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Spring 2008



The Northside Piers is one of the first major waterfront developments in Greenpoint-Williamsburg since the area was rezoned last year. It is the first (and smallest) of three sister towers intended for the site, which was also masterplanned by FXFowle. This first tower will provide 180 units of market-rate and 110 units of affordable housing.



Greenpoint Terminal
Location:East River between Greenpoint Avenue and Oak Street
Developer:John Guttman Real Estate Management
Architect(s):Perkins Eastman
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:13.7 acres, 2.6 million sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Pending approvals



After a massive fire destroyed a row of 19th-century warehouses in Mayyand thereby muted a looming preservation fighttthis 14-acre site along the East River is closer to being redeveloped into a retail, commercial, and residential complex. Perkins Eastman had been asked to plan the site before the fire.



North 8th Street
Location:49 North 8th Street
Developer:Toll Brothers
Architect(s):GreenbergFarrow
Consultant(s):MGJ, Neil Wexler Associates, Scorcia and Diana Associates
Size:6 floors, 40 units, 76,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Winter 2006



The second major collaboration in Williamsburg between the national homebuilding company Toll Brothers and Atlanta-based architecture firm GreenbergFarrow, this six-story building will have a single-loaded corridor so that all 40 units have quality views.



Brooklyn
Central 


Park Slope Apartments
Location:391 Fourth Avenue
Developer:ROSMA Development
Architect(s):TEN Arquitectos
Consultant(s):Severud Associates, Mehandes Engineering
Size:11 floors, 49 units, 53,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Summer 2007



Contextual districts assume a low floor-to-floor height, roughly 8 feet, TEN principal Tim Dumbleton noted, "but the market demands higher ceilings, so it's a challenge to fit more volume within the zoning envelope." TEN achieved 10-foot ceiling heights in this 11-story condo, preserving the monlithic character they desired and meeting setback requirements with a composition of two stacked volumes.



Lookout Hill
Location:199 State Street
Developer:Alchemy Property
Architect(s):FXFowle Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:11 floors, 46 units, 54,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):2007
Budget: $16 million



This 11-story residential project bridges the low-scale residential buildings in Boerum Hill to the south and the taller, mixed-use buildings in downtown Brooklyn to the north. The brick-and-metal-panel facade varies in depth, reducing the building's mass and giving some rhythm to the street wall.



Bronx

Gateway Center
Location:Bronx Terminal Market
Developer:BTM Development Partners
Architect(s):GreenbergFarrow Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:1,000,000 sq. ft.
Budget:$3500$400 million



The Bronx Terminal Market, a major wholesale food market, has long been in need of restoration. In 2004, the Related Companies purchased the property and hired Greenberg-Farrow to masterplan the site and design two three-story retail centers connected by a six-story garage, along with a riverfront park and esplanade.



Henry Hudson Parkway
Location:3260 Henry Hudson Parkway
Developer:Hudson Arlington Associates
Architect(s):Handel Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:9 floors, 127 units, 240,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Winter 2007
Budget:$90 million


Handel Architects' Riverdale project will add over 100 housing units to the neighborhood while preserving its relatively low scale with a nine-story profile. By creating a facade of windows looking to the east and a 60-foot-by-80-foot landscaped courtyard, the architects are hoping to draw attention away from the adjacent freeway and toward the neighborhood.



The Solaria
Location:640 West 237th Street
Developer:Arc Development, LLC
Architect(s):SLCE Architects
Consultant(s):Unavailable
Size:20 floors, 56 Units
Completion (est.):2007


The Solaria's marketing scheme is that it is the star-lover's dream, with New York's only telescope and observatory on the roof. On a common star-gazing deck, building-dwellers will have access to a celestial map as well as educational sessions from the Amateur Astronomer's Association of New York.



Queens

Queens Street Apartments
Location:43317 Dutch Kills Street
Developer:ROSMA Development
Architect(s):TEN Arquitectos
Consultant(s):Mehandes Engineering, D.V.A.
Size:600 units, 500,000 sq. ft.
Completion (est.):Unavailable



The Eagle Electric Manufacturing Company owned eight buildings in Long Island City, including the six-story cast-in-place concrete warehouse that will serve as a base for TEN Arquitectos' 600-foot-tall slab. The residential project, still in concept phase, is in the recently upzoned area along Jackson Avenue near the Sunnyside Yards.



Queens Family Courthouse
Location:89914 Parsons Boulevard
Developer:The Dermot Company
Architect(s):FXFowle Architects
Consultant(s):Kajima Construction Services, Marinos Gerazounis & Jaffe, DeSimone Engineers
Size:12 floors, 380 units, 290,000 sq. ft. residential, 44,000 sq. ft. retail; 19,5000 sq. ft. community
Completion (est.):2007
Budget:$130 million



To comply with HPD specifications, theconversion of the Queens Family Courthouse into housing includes many affordable units and space for community use. The latter will be housed in the historic building, built in 1927 as a library, while housing will occupy the new glazed addition.



5505 48th Avenue
Location:5505 48th Avenue
Developer:Toll Brothers
Architect(s):H. Thomas O'Hara Architects
Consultant(s):Ettinger Associates, Axis Design Group
Size:8 floors, 142,000 sq. ft.; 5 floors, 19,000 sq.ft.; 118 units
Completion (est.):2007



Toll Brothers called on H. Thomas O'Hara to design a low-rise, high-end condominium in the heart of Queen's most industrial neighborhood. The architects responded with not one but two buildings. The base of both structures will be granite and channel glass, while the upper floors will be built out of pre-cast concrete.